how to find dr. right (dermatology edition)

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As one of many people who sees a dermatologist for some kind of reoccurring eczema or atopic dermatitis (AD) and as someone who has cycled through the what feels like all options for treatment (often never finding that perfect product, the lifestyle management, or that patient-doctor connection), and as someone always searching to get to my dream skin, I am always hunting for ways to build a relationship with my future Dr. Right.

The most important part of having a good working relationship with your dermatologist is being able to speak your concerns. I have gotten to a point in my life where, when meeting a new dermatologist, I throw out my entire skin background in a verbal paragraph; the goal being to test the waters of this new budding relationship. Here are some examples below for personal context:

  • I have had topical steroid withdrawal (TSW) before because of my excessive use of steroidal topical ointments in my earlier years, and I am somewhat hesistant to use them now. I am also not entirely interested in oral steroids again, because of their shopping list of side effects. It is important to speak your fears of strong medications, so your derm knows what you need to discuss.
  • I have been using coconut oil on my skin and have had no problems with it except that it didn’t prevent a flare. This bit of information is shared because it’s true (and you never know when new research will come out saying that coconut oil is not as good as we thought it was… e.g. what happened with olive oil) but it also can be used to get the derm’s opinion on natural products/non-dermatologically created alternatives.
  • I have been avoiding gluten and soy (because they are common allergens and because I have other legume allergies) for a while and worry that me starting to eat them again this summer may be part of the reason for my flare. This is brought up to bridge into the field of nutrition to figure out my new derm’s opinions on diet in regards to its effect on eczema and management.
  • I know about the current new drugs on the market (Dupixent) and wonder about its effect on pre/peri/post natal women. It’s crucial to remember to bring up reproduction-related information if you are going to start a drug that hasn’t been tested on men or women for reproductive side effects, if you are interested in having children one day.
  • What is the plan for me and what will my management entail going forward? After all, I want to know she isn’t just going to prescribe me a crap ton of drugs and wish me the best with my life… continuity of care is extremely important for preventative care and management.

In the case with AD, I was hesitant about both topical and oral steroids as the major component of my management, and my derm was receptive to my initial hesitation. However, she also argued with the need for inflammation management, because in an untreated state, chronic inflammation will damage other organs and systems in time. So she walked me through the details about what she was thinking for both types of steroids- the dosages planned and how long she planned to keep me on them. If you are confused about what the drugs do or their safety, it doesn’t hurt to inquire more (for example 60mg of prednisone is on the high end of how much doctors will prescribe).

My derm told me of her roadmap for my management (an important thing you want your dermatologist to bring up!)- how long she’d want me on the oral steroids, which topical steroid was for my face versus which for the rest of my body, how we’d cycle through a 2-week steroidal/1-week non-steroidal topical cycle, and the need for more frequent bleach baths to prevent staph infections from other healthy-skinned people (because everyone carries some level of staph on their skin).

When I asked her my big question — what can I do to prevent these flares from coming back aggressively again, she also brought up diet changes, as well planning future appointments to monitor how the preventative measurements were going. All in all I left with a sense of her being committed to making sure things worked, not just prescribing me all the meds I could carry and hoping I didn’t ever need to come back.

The big takeaway from being a frequent flyer of the dermatology world is that it is okay to need to find a dermatologist who fits with you. You want someone you feel comfortable with, who you can talk to openly and feel like they both have the time to listen and are receptive to your ideas and where you are in your health literacy (i.e. do you like written or oral directions, how familiar are you with the drugs/treatments/interventions, how much you feel you understand or care to understand about the condition as a whole, how it works genetically, immunologically, neurologically, etc).

You should feel like you are leaving with enough information to get you by AND also with your questions answered, but also that you know what to expect and when to reconnect with the derm in the event that something isn’t working just right. You don’t want to feel like you’ve heard it all before, or that there is something the derm just isn’t getting about you. The relationship needs to be out on the table and the communication level high. If you have persistent remaining questions- ask them! If you are frustrated by something, voice it!

With any chronic disease, management relies on the ability to be able to communicate your feelings and symptoms, and on the ability of the provider to be able to give you the support and care contingency to make sure that you don’t falls through the cracks in the system. So when working to develop a fruitful and useful relationship with your dermatologist, don’t be afraid to be a bit selective and work through difficult questions to see if you have found your Dr. Right.

 

Here’s a photo of my own hands October 2016 (left) and March 2017 (right):

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Author: Cally

aspiring writer, bibliophile, botanical enthusiast, human with eczema, wife to @lumbercake

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