all posts, the eczema body

worried about lymphoma?

pexels-photo-579474.jpeg

One of the most frustrating aspects of having chronic atopic dermatitis is that many of the symptoms overlap with Hodgkin’s lymphoma, but since the latter is rare, it is seemingly unlikely that a person will have it while also being difficult to have enough concrete signs and symptoms that a doctor will feel it warrants further investigation.

For example, the primary symptoms of Hodgkin’s described by the cancer organization are enlarged lymph nodes (especially in the neck, armpit, or groin), intermittent or constant fever, night sweats, weight loss, itchy skin, loss of appetite, and tiredness. Chronic eczema for me has hit virtually all of those but a fever (and I never have fevers even when I am sick… in fact I didn’t even have a fever when I had a staph infection in my lymph nodes some years back!).

The other rub (possibly because of the overlap of symptoms with eczema) is that Hodgkin’s is generally not detected early on, and so unless symptoms changed drastically over a short duration (which I’m not sure this type of cancer does), it would be hard to know if what I had was Hodgkin’s or just another day of swollen lymph nodes, without getting a biopsy of said lymph nodes to confirm. Even then, apparently it can be necessary to need multiple samples to track what’s happening with the lymph node over time.

This is why I believe it is crucial to one, keep track of your own symptoms and body and immediately go in to see someone when something feels off. You are the only person that lives in your body and so it is important for you to be able to track what is going on because no one else will have the lifetime of records that you do. Two, it is so important to find a PCP/provide who you trust and feel able to develop a working relationship with as time goes on. It is necessary to build this relationship over time and feel confident that you are being heard, and always ask questions when you don’t understand or aren’t sure what will happen next. A lot of the preventative care comes from making sure you are ready and informed about what is going on with your body.

I’m currently on that second stage- working towards getting a new PCP (as I recently moved into a new town), in order to establish some kind of plan to understand when my symptoms are just eczema, and when they could be indicative of something more.

Today, I had a check up at my OB/GYN office where they gave me the glucose test (you drink a really sugary drink and they draw your blood an hour later to see if you produce enough insulin to handle the drink). Along with the blood draw testing my insulin levels, I got back data on my WBC, RBC, and the breakdowns. Apparently I have higher than average WBC, and a variation of out-of-range monophil, lymphocyte, esophil, and neutrophil levels that basically make it seem like I am fighting a bacterial/fungal infection or something of the sort, but also still could fall into the realm of someone with lymphoma. So in a nutshell I am still destined to schedule a PCP to try and make sense of all this data and see if there is a cluster of data points that would help more or less clear up the sensitivity or specificity of whether or not I need to get checked for lymphoma.

 

REFERENCES

“Signs and Symptoms of Hodgkins Lymphoma.” American Cancer Society, https://www.cancer.org/cancer/hodgkin-lymphoma/detection-diagnosis-staging/signs-and-symptoms.html. Accessed 4 Apr 2018.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s