eczema, my journey, skin biome, skin care

there are germs on my skin! part 2

selective focus photography of person wearing three bangles
Photo by Godisable Jacob on Pexels.com

It’s my favorite time of year and I just received my Chuckling Goat package (but more on that in a bit).

2018-10-02 13.40.38

A few months back I wrote a post about the skin biome and how I was excited by the small movement of companies creating products geared towards helping it. Since then there have been developments about different companies creating products to help either work with the natural skin biome or to help reintroduce micro-diversity to create an appropriate balance for healthy skin.

I didn’t know it previously, but Johnson and Johnson had a movement a while back to create products that didn’t mess up the skin microbiome of babies’ skin. Such products, like Aveeno Eczema Therapy Moisturizing Cream have a trial indicating that they actually help to increase the microbiome diversity of the skin with use over time.

The company has become skin microbiome-focused in a multitude of ways, including offering use of their JLINX incubator under the JLABS. S-Biomedic has joined JLINX and is working to create products that remove the bad bacteria and replace it with good ones to balance out the diversity of the skin back to a healthy level. This idea of balance is becoming more and more accepted as it is found that overuse of antibiotics is causing more harm than good for conditions like eczema. Studies are showing that balanced diversity is what we need for our skin biome, rather than sterility (noting that antibiotics still have their place, including when surgery or infection is involved). Microbiome transplants are now no longer a thing of the future but are instead potentially the next big medical treatment protocol!

More recently, I read a book called The Good Skin Solution by Shann Nix Jones, that talked about the gut and skin microbiome and Jones’ personal experience as to how she came to develop a treatment to help manage her young son’s eczema. The goal was to help increase the diversity of both microbiome using the probiotics in kefir made from their goats’ milk. When it was a success with their son, her and her husband decided to sell their products and hence the Chuckling Goat business was born.

Jones reintroduced me the theory that you need to fix your gut microbiome to have any really lasting effect on your skin, but she added the idea that it’s best to treat both at the same time, (hence her her program that includes probiotics for both the skin and the gut). Needless to say I was intrigued so I looked into her products and went on to order some (but unfortunately I can’t get the kefir drinks because I live in the states and they don’t ship that outside of the UK).

Today the soaps and lotions arrived and I am beyond excited to receive them (happy as a clam… or a ceramic jack-o-lantern!). See my spoils below:

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I’ll have to figure out what to do to increase my gut flora diversity in lieu of kefir, as I was advised to avoid dairy while breastfeeding to see if that helped with Fi’s digestive woes. I’m not sure if goat milk would be okay since it is supposed to have less allergenic components than milk. I may just wait until Fi is done breastfeeding.

 

REFERENCES

Capone K, Klein SL, Kirchner F, Tierney N. “Effects of Topical Lotions on the Atopic Dermatitis Skin Microbiome and Associations with Itch and Skin Barrier Function.” 76th Annual Society for Investigatiev Dermatology (SID) Meeting, Portland, OR. 26-29 Apr, 2017. Poster presentation.

Myles IA, Earland, NJ, Anderson ED, Moore IN, Kieh MD, Williams KW, Saleem A, Fontecilla NM, Welch PA, Darnell DA, Barnhart LA, Sun AA, Uzel G, Datta SK. First-in-human topical microbiome transplantation with Roseomonas mucosa for atopic dermatitis. JCI Insight. 2018 May 3;3(9):e120608.

Parikh-Das A, Ganopolsky I, Nunez C, Moreira L. A clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a OTC colloidal oatmeal skin protectant cream in the management of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in infants and toddlers. JAAD. 2017 Jun 76(6);AB10.

Puniewska, Madgalena. “How the Microbiome Could Transform Your Skin in Surprising Ways.” Johnson&Johnson Innovation, 12 Oct. 2017, https://www.jnj.com/innovation/how-the-microbiome-could-transform-your-skin-in-surprising-ways.

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).

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