books, eczema, libraries, my journey

on libraries

assorted books on shelf
Photo by Element5 Digital on Pexels.com

I mentioned this before but eczema has given me lots of time to read, partially because it keeps my hands busy to hold a book, and partially because when I have the worst of flares I don’t have the energy to do anything besides curl up in a ball on the couch with a blanket draped around me and turn pages while trying to minimize any movement of the rest of my body. Luckily the latter hasn’t happened in a while, but since I have gotten back into the swing of reading, I have renewed my relationship with libraries (pun intended). I had gotten my new town library card a while back but recently I have been aggressively making use of it. We’re talking 10 books at a time and steadily getting 1-2 more books each week (yes I have a problem).

Anyway, historically, I have always been a voracious reader. I have memories of being ten and sitting down under the playground reading fictional adventure novels while kids ran around me. This happened only if the book was magically compelling, and surprisingly lots of YA fiction novels are at that age.

I also distinctly remember the awkward moment when at a family reunion I was hiding away under a bed reading the newest Harry Potter book when someone sat on it. The mattress springs crunched above me uncomfortably, so I snaked out an arm and gently tapped the family member’s ankle, sending them into an understandable jump-off-the-ground-in-total-fear-mixed-with-surprise moment. I stopped hiding under beds to read soon after (partially because I grew too big).

I also remember years and years of trying to read during car rides while sitting in the back of my mom’s old Honda van on that way to visit some family, and feeling car sick from focusing on the words swaying about with the car’s inertia.

As I also love things that are free (catch me in my hand-me-down clothes even as a late twenty-something mom), my love for libraries is not much of a surprise. My earliest memories of libraries are glimpses of bright lig t shining through musly building windows and rows on rows of colorful books. I remember getting excited that I could pick out whatever I wanted and the smell of old books and how I loved feeling the pages of a wellworn novel. Those strong sensory experiences continue to evoke my love.

There are also unidentified memories of accompanying my Oma, my best friend’s mom, and many others to unfamiliar libraries on book returning errands, and memories of playing those generic learning games on those chunky monitors screens.

I remember as an elementary school student, that we had those book fairs (done by Scholastic Books I believe), which excited me to no end, and always happened in the library. I was one of those kids that liked to get some new books, and those cutesy erasers.

I remember as a teen, trekking up the half mile or so from my house to the local public library, often with my friend Julia, to see what books we could find next. We had voracious appetites for fiction and fantasy, and I remember ambling through the shelves often picking books to read based on their titles or their cover art when I had no specific “to-reads” in mind. When I moved back home with my parents after college, I restarted my walking sojourns to said library, mostly to resume my enjoyment of fiction novels in between work.

I remember in high school, after tearing my ACL and not being able to run track and field senior spring, I hung out in the library with my “potluck” friends (so named because our hangouts started via a potluck meal). My grades actually improved while there so I graduated with an even higher GPA thus avoiding the stereotype of “senior slump”. And it was there that I started Pet Sementary and had my first intro to Stephen King and to more adult horror books (I had enjoyed Goosebumps when I was younger).

In college I made myself a home at the science library (Cornell) on my free time, and started working their my sophomore year as a library assistant for work study. My now husband recalls always making sure to come chat with me when I was at the front desk as he was already crushing on me. I remember getting to work the closing shifts on nights and weekends and as a result, getting to be one of the last people in the library. I wasn’t a night person so that was often exhausting, but also a weirdly surreal experience as the  building that housed the library (called the science center) was generally emptied out on weekends at that point with most of the lights off. It was quite peaceful.

I remember my friend Becky and I staking our claim in a space and waiting it out in the college’s larger library (McCabe), working away until 10pm when they brought out the snacks. It was also a common library for group study as there were these study rooms on the upper floors if you wanted more privacy. I went back recently and some of the layout had changed (on the main floor at least) and it was so disorienting. Seeing a library change, even if it is for the better (which it was) is such a sucker punch to the memory.

For graduate school (MGH Institute of Health Professions in Boston) I would hide away in this attic-esque corner of the library with my friends, where we would study and sometimes practice physical therapy techniques on one another on the floor, but more often than not we would chat and enjoy life while simultaneously complaining about the breadth of material to study.

I once accompanied Jake last minute on a business trip to Ybor in Tampa, Florida. While he was doing his work thing, I decided to kill time by investigating the local library (the Robert W. Saunders Sr. Public Library). I had to walk about 2 miles to get there but it didn’t deter me. I always find it fascinating to see libraries in new states. I didn’t get a lot of time to explore it but I saw that it offers meals to those in need between 11:30am and 12:30pm and had different historical plaques and pictures about it like those below.

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I also worked in the Cambridge Public Library when I was volunteering for the Eradicate Childhood Obesity Foundation and got used to navigating around one of the biggest (and oldest) library establishments in the country.

And now I have my town library where I currently do effectively drive-bys: running in to acquire books on hold and returning the books I’ve read before taking the munchkin home. I also, on occssion, explore the small town libraries nearby, getting jealous at some of the beautiful redone buildings and children’s sections. Most of all I look forward to Fi getting older so I can instill my love of books in her, spread my love of libraries and share my memories made in them while we make new ones together.

Parting note: if you are someone that wonders how libraries will stay relevant in a society where most everything is accessible online and via our phones, you should read the book Bibliotech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google by John Palfrey. Palfrey explains multiple reasons that libraries are important, besides just to borrow books. There are a few other books I’ve read about libraries and their history and/or significance that I’m happy to talk more about if asked.

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).

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