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the 4th trimester, books, and blogs

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I’m combining all my other blogs’ content to this site. Please bear with me as I post older content.  🙂

The “4th trimester” is a term that has growing in popularity recently (and with it better policies!). It refers to the first 3 months after a baby is born, when there is still substantial growing happening (the baby develops the ability to sweat, to produce tears, to hold his/her head up, etc).

The exciting part is just how much more this period of time is being acknowledged by the women’s health community, including by healthcare providers. People are realizing that this is a period that can be quite difficult for women to adjust to, as well as babies. More discussions about postpartum depression, as well as physiological changes that can happen to the women are being had  (like how many women find that their stomach muscles do not “bounce back” after birth whether its due to diastasis recti aka abdominal muscle separation, or from having issues with pelvic organ prolapse).

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists came out with a statement called “Optimizing Postpartum Care” this past May that talks about changes they believe should be included in the healthcare protocols/coverage, including an initial contact with the Ob/Gyn within 3 weeks of the baby being born, and then a comprehensive examination by 12 weeks to include “a full assessment of physical, social, and psychological well-being, including the following domains: mood and emotional well-being; infant care and feeding; sexuality, contraception, and birth spacing; sleep and fatigue; physical recovery from birth; chronic disease management; and health maintenance”.

There are also doctors out there like Eva Zasloff (the founder of Tova Health), who are trying to reform postpartum care even more by offering comprehensive combined mom and baby postpartum care via home visits. So instead of having to rush out to the doctors’ offices for all these check-ups, she (or someone from her team) comes to you to allow you and your baby to get checked from the comfort of your own home, which can also reduce the likelihood of getting infections/sicknesses from others coming in to see the doctor. Honest Mamas, a group of three moms who are also psychotherapists who make podcasts recently did an interview with Dr. Zasloff that can be found here.

My obsession about learning more about the 4th trimester (in tandem with my love of understanding how pregnancy, motherhood, and parenting are done in other countries) led me to this article called “How the World Nourishes Mothers” the other day on goop.com. They did a Q&A with Heng Ou, a mother and the creator of MotherBees, a company that does meal deliveries to new moms. The meals are based on zuo yuezi, a Chinese ideology of nourishing a new mom with specific warming foods to welcome her and help her transition into motherhood. Ou also wrote a book called The First Forty Days, which I plan to read (and use!) and will write up about afterwards in my books of the season post.

It’s interesting to think about how different cultures respond to new moms. For women that are blessed with communities and support systems, a wide array of behaviors can be seen, from how much rest time moms are expected to have, to what foods people bring them.

And lastly, since I first wrote this when I was getting quite close to my own due date, I’ve been looking to hear more about the 4th trimesters experience of new moms’. One morning, amidst a bout of insomnia, I came across this post by Jen Eddins on her blog Peanut Butter Runner. She talks about her life as a mom of a now 3-week old, her emotions, how her body is doing, etc.

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