eczema, my journey, skin biome, skin care

the skin biome part 2

autumn decoration fall field
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

It’s my favorite time of year and I just received my Chuckling Goat package (but more on that in a bit).

2018-10-02 13.40.38

A few months back I wrote a post about the skin biome and how I was excited by the small movement of companies creating products geared towards helping it. Since then there have been developments about different companies creating products to help either work with the natural skin biome or to help reintroduce micro-diversity to create an appropriate balance for healthy skin.

I didn’t know it previously, but Johnson and Johnson had a movement a while back to create products that didn’t mess up the skin microbiome of babies’ skin. Such products, like Aveeno Eczema Therapy Moisturizing Cream have some studies showing that they actually help to increase the microbiome diversity of the skin with use over time.

The company has become skin microbiome-focused in a multitude of ways, including offering use of their JLINX incubator under the JLABS. S-Biomedic has joined JLINX and is working to create products that remove the bad bacteria and replace it with good ones to balance out the diversity of the skin back to a healthy level. This idea of balance is becoming more and more accepted as it is found that overuse of antibiotics is causing more harm than good for conditions like eczema. Studies are showing that balanced diversity is what we need for our skin biome, rather than sterility (noting that antibiotics still have their place, including when surgery or infection is involved). Microbiome transplants are now no longer a thing of the future but are instead potentially the next big medical treatment protocol!

More recently, I read a book called The Good Skin Solution by Shann Nix Jones, that talked about the gut and skin microbiome and Jones’ personal experience as to how she came to develop a treatment to help manage her young son’s eczema. The goal was to help increase the diversity of both microbiome using the probiotics in kefir made from their goats’ milk. When it was a success with their son, her and her husband decided to sell their products and hence the Chuckling Goat business was born.

Jones reintroduced me the theory that you need to fix your gut microbiome to have any really lasting effect on your skin, but she added the idea that it’s best to treat both at the same time, (hence her her program that includes probiotics for both the skin and the gut). Needless to say I was intrigued so I looked into her products and went on to order some (but unfortunately I can’t get the kefir drinks because I live in the states and they don’t ship that outside of the UK).

Today the soaps and lotions arrived and I am beyond excited to receive them (happy as a clam… or a ceramic jack-o-lantern!). See my spoils below:

2018-10-02 13.40.42

I’ll have to figure out what to do to increase my gut flora diversity in lieu of kefir, as I was advised to avoid dairy while breastfeeding to see if that helped with Fi’s digestive woes. I’m not sure if goat milk would be okay since it is supposed to have less allergenic components than milk. I may just wait until Fi is done breastfeeding.

 

REFERENCES

Myles IA, Earland, NJ, Anderson ED, Moore IN, Kieh MD, Williams KW, Saleem A, Fontecilla NM, Welch PA, Darnell DA, Barnhart LA, Sun AA, Uzel G, Datta SK. First-in-human topical microbiome transplantation with Roseomonas mucosa for atopic dermatitis. JCI Insight. 2018 May 3;3(9):e120608.

Parikh-Das A, Ganopolsky I, Nunez C, Moreira L. A clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a OTC colloidal oatmeal skin protectant cream in the management of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in infants and toddlers. JAAD. 2017 Jun 76(6);AB10.

Puniewska, Madgalena. “How the Microbiome Could Transform Your Skin in Surprising Ways.” Johnson&Johnson Innovation, 12 Oct. 2017, https://www.jnj.com/innovation/how-the-microbiome-could-transform-your-skin-in-surprising-ways.

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).

eczema, my journey, pregnancy, skin biome, skin care, women's health, wounds and infections

breast milk for wound healing

agriculture animal blue sky breakfast
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

As some of you may know I am currently nursing my 3 month old baby girl, and in doing so as she is my first, I’ve learned that leaking is a thing (sometimes it occurs when she’s nursing on one side- the other side will start to drip milk, and other times they seem to leak for no apparently reason at all). As I wear nursing pads in my shirts during the day, the problem begins at night when I’m in bed trying to sleep. The leakage then can be really annoying. So my most recent solution has been spreading the milk on my skin, because why not- it’s already leaking all over it anyway.

My less impulsive logic for trying this experiment came from some research I had been doing a few weeks ago about breastmilk and its health benefits for the baby. Fi got sick and I wanted to know how her immature immune system could handle sickness when she only intakes breastmilk as her food source. This search led me to an internet viral photo showing how a mom’s breast milk changed when her infant got sick. The 2013 study mentioned in that post talks about breast milk’s immunological function and explains how when the mom or baby get sick, the number of leukocytes (aka white blood cells) in the breast milk drastically increases to help protect them, because leukocytes help fight disease (which I found to be such a cool example of symbiosis. I personally have also noticed that breastfeeding seems to keep both me and the baby from getting too severe of sicknesses. In fact, my mom, mother-in-law, and husband each got sick after the baby was born yet Fi and I were fine!).

I also read an article by NPR addressing the breastfeeding versus formula debate for poor countries.  A point it stated made me more curious about breast milk; it said formula can cause increased risks of diarrhea and respiratory infections. I assumed this is so because it requires using water to make (and clean sources are not always available in impoverished countries) but maybe it’s also because formula doesn’t have the same chemical and bacterial composition to allow it to be readily accepted by the baby’s developing digestive and immune systems? By extension I supposed that breast milk had to have some component in it that generally allows it to not irritate the digestive and immune systems*… which is my big sign to think “MICROBIOME” (* this of course is excluding when the baby has allergies or sensitivities to something the mom is eating that is going into her breast milk). The article also talked about how it’s weird that we are constantly trying to research the benefits of breastfeeding when it’s as natural as “breathing, chewing, hearing, passing stool”. But we live in a society where we need evidence and so I decided to play the game of informal (and badly controlled) science to see if I could test my own theory, that breast milk may help with (eczema) healing.

I did not participate in the rigors of the scientific process because I am lazy and I doubt Fi would be content amusing herself long enough for me to do it, but instead I just dabbed some breast milk on my shallow cuts every now and then instead of using neosporin or leaving the cut alone. My observations: it would seem as though breast milk can help with reducing the pain of shallow cuts (I tried it on the cracks on my knuckles and outer ears, cuts on my ankles and hands), and helps to speed up the healing of said cuts. It does not moisturize (the spots I put it on tended to be drier the next day… though that could be because when cuts heal on me, they start skin flaking…) but overall, the spots I put it on did seem to heal up and achieve a cleaner scab and softer skin around it.

Apparent cons of this experiment? The milk can sometimes burn (but again, everything burns when it touches my inflamed skin spots… even water) and it’s also a little sticky but it dries sticky-free. Fun fact, I have a pet peeve about being sticky. I hate it. So much.

After this self experiment, I was more curious to support why I might be seeing the results I saw so I did some low level cursory research. Also speaking of research, I received my diploma the other day. I officially have a Master of Science in Health Sciences from MGH Institute of Health Professions. I am now a MASTER of science. The academic title of master seems somewhat archaic; I envision myself similar in status to an entry-level alchemist or and mage, as I have established myself in a trade, but it will still take years to perfect my craft. Anyway…

There’s not a lot of recent research being done (or at least it’s not readily available yet) but I did come across two recent ones. This first paper, of which I could only access the abstract, tested wound healing of the cornea (yes, of the eye) in mice using human breast milk, milk from mice, artificial tears, and the control group. The results were that the human breast milk caused the fastest healing, followed by the mouse milk. The other two groups (artifucial tears and the control) were still not healed by the end of day two. The other study I found was published in 2015 in Nature, and it was titled, “Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of accuse inflammation”. It came to the conclusion that the lipid mediator-specializing proresolving mediator profile (a ratio of sorts between lipid mediators and specialized proresolving mediators) in human milk helped the macrophages (or cells that engulf bad bacteria) to contain pathogens and remove dead cells (in a process called efferocytosis- my word of the day). It is important to note that this was seen in vivo (in mice), and that breast milk was not applied topically to the skin. If the results are applicable to humans, I see this study as being useful because people with eczema suffer high levels of inflammation internally not just on their skin, and because turning off the inflammatory phase is also important in wound healing (more on this in a later post).

After that article I backtracked and wanted to know more about what breast milk is, which led me to this document that included the various components of breast milk (though I can not find the professor or the molecular virology lab anywhere else on the web…). Also note that the tables say the various factors are tested “in vitro” meaning not in the organism (for example, secretory IgA from breast milk was probably removed from breast milk and tested in a petri dish against E. coli). Even so, the breadth of potential abilities of breast milk, due to its staggering list of factors alone was interesting in its own right.

In conclusion, though I don’t think breast milk applied externally heals the mother’s eczema or TSW, I do think it can help me with superficial wounds, especially when it’s the middle of the night and I am otherwise unmotivated to leave the bed even if I’ve been scratching.

 

REFERENCES

Arnardottir H, Orr SK, Dalli J, Serhan CN. Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of acute inflammation. Mucosal Immunology. 2016, May 9;9(3):757-766.

Asena L, Suveren EH, Karabay G, Durson Altinors D. Human Breast Milk Drops Promote Coreanl Epithelial Wound Healing. Curr Eye Res. 2017 Apr;43(4):506-512.

eczema, poems, skin care

an ode to new season

nature red forest leaves
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I love me some fall.
Born right before a time of thanks giving,
All Hallows eve as the favorite,
But Dia de los Muertes too,
And the allure of the medieval faires,
costumes, candy and color.

I love the crisp air smells,
the harvest season of bounty.
Pumpkins and apples are two of my favorites,
prerequisites for my sweet tooth preferences.
Surplus of hot beverages to soothe my soul.
Autumn is my season.

At the same time though,
eczema provokes hatred of cold.
The nip of jack frost early,
Equates regression to grumpy inconsolable,
as dampness of this coast seeps into the soul.

With autumn’s arrival,
Outfits at home are often accessorized,
with blankets,
the thicker the better,
new wealth built by warm layers.
Snuggles are needed,
for satiety of a vampire of heat,
but alas skin prevents it from being fait accompli,
as healing is slow.
In lieu, the bath,
concoction that I brew
to foster the feel
of physical familial warm
to ward of the bite
of Autumn’s sojourn

alternative/holistic medicine, eczema, food and nutrition, skin care

basil for eczema

green leaf plant on brown wooden surface
Photo by monicore on Pexels.com

I have decided to start a new series within the blog. I have had a deep and abiding love for herbs and gardening since I was a wee one (I used to try to collect dandelion roots to make my own coffee around age 12, despite the fact that I didn’t drink coffee. Anyway, I digress). As a result of said love, I have decided to really delve in and learn about an herb, and then I’ll hopefully try to use that herb to create something (be it edible, a body product, incense, or other) to use to help manage my eczema.

Currently, my garden looks like this below, so I’ve got a lot to work with (basil, wood sorrel, marshmallow, licorice, oregano, sage, thyme, rosemary, raspberry leaves, chives):

2018-08-05 19.54.04

To start off this series, I collected basil from my garden last week. I have two types, sweet basil, and English basil, but I only used the sweet type.

Screen Shot 2018-08-08 at 12.24.10 PM

Sweet basil, or (ocimum basilicum), is an edible herb of which we eat the leaf and flowering top. It’s other names include St. Joseph wort, arjaka, and luole.

  • ocimum = ‘smell’
  • basilicum = ‘kingly’

Historically in Europe it was a symbol of love/romance and of grief, and it has associations with the Basilisk (it was thought to be poisonous in the past).

To grow it you need rich, well-draining but moist soil, and full sun. It can grow well in containers too if you don’t let it flower. The season to grow it is in summer.

For food: It’s usually used in soups, salads, with eggs, most red meats, in tomato sauces, or in general cooking. I’ve also heard of it being used in ice cream though I have yet to see or try it. It combines well with vegetables such as zucchini, beans, and mushrooms.

It’s key constituents include:

  • essential oils
  • caffeic acid
  • tannins (estragole and eugenol)
    • estragole can have a sharp/hot and numbing effect
    • eugenol is in cinnamon and cloves; it imparts a spiciness
  • monoterpenes
  • beta-carotene
  • vitamin C

It can be used to make teas, tonics, poultices, etc.

It is used to help with:

  • itches and pain (of bug bites and other small wounds)
  • removing heavy metals and toxins from the body
  • promoting the growth of hair, specifically oily types
  • melancholy/low spirits and headaches/stress (due to its antispasmodic properties)
  • fatigue if it’s steeped in wine (so if you are going for a glass anyway, might as well add some basil in there)
  • deterring flies (though I am not sure how well that works)
  • indigestion, stomach cramps, relieving nausea and vomiting, and easing gas (because it’s an aphrodisiac)

Given that basil is a pretty frequent herb in our savory meals already, (and because I can’t eat dairy currently for Fiona, so alas no basil ice cream), I decided I wanted to use it in a non-edible manner. As I’m always thinking about my skin, I decided to make it into a skin toner. I talked about it a bit in a recent post (korean skincare for eczema), but here’s a picture of it again:

Screen Shot 2018-08-03 at 8.56.26 AM

The final product was lovely. It was refreshing and smelled delightful. The recipe I used is here, and I did add a little witch hazel. It’s fairly gentle on my skin and in the future I may try it without any witch hazel.

Just in case the above link ever gets taken away, the recipe was as followed:

  • bring 3 tbsp freshly crushed basil leaves to a boil for 4-5 minutes
  • remove from heat and let cool to room temperature
  • strain leaves from mixture
  • add teaspoon of witch hazel (optional)
  • place liquid in a bottle (glass preferred)
  • store in refrigerator for one week

To use:

  • pour about a teaspoon onto a cotton ball and gently dab onto face as wanted, or
  • freeze and then use the cubes on face as a pore minimizer after a wash

 

 

alternative/holistic medicine, eczema, exercise and activity, flare-up, food and nutrition, my journey, NEA, pregnancy, relationships, skin biome, skin care, sugar, topical steroid withdrawal, topical steroids, topicals, women's health, wounds and infections

my deviation from the beaten path

gray pathway surrounded by green tress
Photo by Skitterphoto on Pexels.com

Today’s post is all about trying to convey what life with eczema is like for me. The first thing I need to stress is that my condition was not always this severe. I can remember a “before”, as my condition didn’t start affecting my skin globally until I was 21 or 22.

So how has eczema affected me?

  • insomnia – Some nights I was unable to sleep until 6am. More recently off and on I have difficulty sleeping from midnight to about 6am.
  • food paranoia – Given that I have legitimate food allergies to peanuts, pistachios and cashews, I know how to deal with food allergies that cause anaphylaxis. What I don’t know how to deal with is the thought that some common food might have developed into being the cause for the severity of my skin issues. Also sometimes I’ll eat something that is usually fine for consumption, and I’ll break out in hives in my mouth inexplicably and the next time I consume said food, it won’t happen.
  • many different diets – I have tried the gambit of elimination diets, auto-immune diets, vegetarianism, paleo diets, sugar-free diets, low-carb diets, detox diets, etc).
  • food-related social repercussion – You have no idea how frustrating it is to have people think I am “just being picky” when I am avoiding certain foods or diets. It’s usually when I’m avoiding gluten, dairy, or soy or other common American-diet staples. What I don’t understand is why people think I enjoy avoiding these foods… do they not know my undying love for pizza and ice cream?
  • intimacy issues – picture not being able to cuddle on the couch while watching a scary movie without covering myself in a blanket to make sure my skin doesn’t touch my husbands. Long drawn out hugs? Nope.
  • skin-to-skin with baby issues – I have adapted to the lifestyle of needing to put a barrier between me and my baby’s skin. When I feed her, I throw a cloth on or wear long sleeves before I put her head on my arms. When I have her in a carrier, I try to put a layer between her face and my chest, or else I know I’ll have to take her out earlier as my chest will start turning red, flushing, and itching.
  • exercise limitations – Up until my junior year of college I was doing many different sports and activities including soccer, track and field, long runs on my own, ultimate frisbee, generically running around like an idiot, etc. Post-eczema life, unless I can get a flare to calm down for months, cardio is a nightmare. Hell, at this point in time, just going for a long walk in the summer induces itching everywhere that takes at least 10 minutes in an air-conditioned building to relieve.
  • summer nightmare – See what I mentioned about walking above and now just add that to general life in the summer. I do well if I don’t move, and if I avoid direct sunlight. Though I also need sunlight for vitamin D (and in my previous life I loved the sun) so I’ll pop outside for a few minutes to bask in the sun’s warm embrace and then I’ll overheat and have to come inside. At least the itching only starts if I sweat.
  • pain (cracked skin) – During certain stages of a flare I dry out (especially at night or after washing my hands or other random times) and my skin will crack. The worst areas are my hands (which will fissure all over) and my ears, as well as sometimes under my eyes.
  • obsession – I spend so much time thinking about my skin and worrying over if I am doing something to make it worse, or not doing enough. It gets exhausting really.
  • career switching – I dropped out of my physical therapy doctorate program because I just couldn’t deal with my skin. I wasn’t sleeping, I was uncomfortable sitting (more on that in a bit), and I couldn’t stand being in an air-conditioned room (see below), or being touched or coming in contact with another’s skin, which made it incredibly difficult to practice the hands on aspects of PT. I am now still in a stage of making my own career, which while exciting, is stressful when I have to talk about it because it’s not a clear cut “oh, yeah, I do X” anymore.
  • fear of infections – As my skin barrier is compromised so often, the risk of infections, primarily Staph, is high. I spend a lot of time wondering if I am infected and worrying when I catch a cold or something that I have contracted Staph (again).
  • hand washing (pain/itching) – Imagine how many times you have to wash your hands or use hand sani when you are a PT student working in a clinic. Doing dishes is irritating enough. Sometimes even just taking a shower will irritate my skin.
  • cleaning frequency – Given that I shed skin faster than the average human, I spend a lot of time cleaning to try to not live in my own skin dust filth.
  • social situation aversion – When I am flaring, I have no desire to go out, not only because I worry about the stares I get for physical appearances, but also because it takes so much energy to deal with varying temperatures, varying foods, varying stressors, usually a lot of sitting, the inability to play/dance without itching, etc.
  • general discomfort (pain, itch, smell) – Eczema this severe is uncomfortable. The obvious is that it itches, and not like a “I have a random little itch” but more on the level of if a swam of mosquitoes bite you all over your body but instead of having angry welt-y bite marks externally, they are all inside your body and not visible to anyone. The pain comes from the cracking I mentioned above, as well as the pain of the self-inflicted wounds from scratching too hard. When I have a bad flare, I develop this scent that I call the burning rubber skin that I loathe.
  • depression and anxiety – It’s no surprise that aggressive and long lasting flares take an emotional toll. As I spend time in pain, itching, paranoid about foods I eat, avoiding people, and unable to exercise and play as I normally would, sometimes my moods take a nose dive.
  • money spent – From skin care lotions and moisturizers, general soaps, bath products (bleach, epsom salt, apple cider vinegar), natural house cleaning products, dry brushes, the rebounder, to the doctors’ visits, etc, this condition isn’t cheap.
  • doctor visits (dermatologists, endocrinologists, neurologists) – There is something very frustrating about seeing many doctors and still getting no relief. I have moved a few times in the last past 4 years and as a result have an even larger number of individual doctor visits under my belt. The general consensus? I am fine (as in no underlying crazy cause of my skin issues like cancer), but I have eczema. Oh and have I tried using steroids creams? -.-
  • hormone imbalances – Since I spent so much time inflamed, I usually have a highly elevated level of immune stuff, like my white blood cell count. When my skin first started going haywire, I also have high cortisol level, which made doctors think I had a hormonal imbalance and first order an MRI of my brain.
  • forever fielding questions – “Have you tried X??” “What’s wrong with your skin?” “Do you use lotion?”
  • excoriation disorder (dermatillomania) – Due to very often having flaky skin, I have developed a picking disorder where I spend inordinate amounts of time trying to remove dead skin from my body. It’s become partially therapeutic and partially me trying to exert control over my uncontrollable presentation.
  • scratching OCD – I scratch all the time. In my sleep, when I’m stressed, when I’m relaxing. I don’t even notice I’m doing it sometimes.
  • scarring – Go figure from all that scratching I’d have scars.
  • ring wearing/jewelry/piercings – I no longer wear my wedding band on my left hand because the ring finger on that side is usually swollen. I wear it on my right now. I also had to take out my belly button piercing, my nose piercing, and all ear piercings except tragus one because the skin started itching so badly around them all.
  • hot inflamed skin with cold chills/shivering – One of the worst stages of a flare is when my skin is constantly wet and weeping and heated, but I’m losing so much heat that I am internal freezing and will shiver uncontrollably.
  • winter is bad – It’s hard enough to regulate my body temperature without the weather outside being frigid.
  • sensitivity to pressure contact (sitting/laying down) – This made PT school very trying. Hell, going to a doctors office and laying on the table, or sitting on a chair for too long made my skin feel terrible and heat up and start itching. This is even through wearing long sleeves and pants.
  • nervousness = flares – Some nervousness is good for keeping our brains alert. Unfortunately, any little bit of social nervousness (like before a practical or talking to new people) would cause me to start to flare and itch.
  • wrinkly, swollen skin – Still not sure why this happens (maybe it’s a product of topical steroid withdrawal) but the skin around my joints especially, on the extensor side, starts to look like that of an elephant.
  • discoloration – From redness to drying out gray/white, I am a veritable human mood ring.

And since people love me and will forever want to help, here is a list of what I have already tried:

  • topical steroids (for a good 20 years as this was the main accepted solution to eczema for decades)
  • topical medicines that are not steroids (Elidel/protopic, etc)
  • oral steroids
  • lotions/moisturizers (cetaphil, cera ve, aquaphor, dove eczema line, exederm, burt’s bees, obscurely-named-other-ones, etc)
  • going moisturizer free (actually does help with the red/weeping stage)
  • ocean water
  • chlorinated pools
  • naturopathy
  • acupuncture (including herbs, cupping, and massage)
  • diet (gluten free, soy free, dairy free, vegetarian, sugar free)
  • phototherapy (clinically done in light boxes, and just being in the sun)
  • antihistamines
  • sleep aid pills
  • yoga, meditation, and deep breathing
  • coconut and sunflower oil
  • bleach, epsom, and apple cider vinegar baths
  • antibiotics
  • collagen powder (edible)
  • collagen cream
  • wound care
  • probiotics

Update: I have not tried any biologics because I have been pregnant and am now nursing.

Despite all the shit that comes with eczema, there have been some silver linings in my experience including:

  • Having to deal with eczema year round has made me live much more seasonally. In the warmer months I try to take advantage of being able to walk outside for hours and garden to get vitamin D and get exposed to bacteria in the soil (and as stress relievers). In the colder months I turn to herbal teas and nourishing soups, and bundle up well to go on walks to get fresh air. I pay a lot more attention to what can grow when, and try to eat accordingly (like lighter foods in the summertime).
  • Having dealt with the difficulties of eczema for so long, in juxtaposition pregnancy wasn’t half bad (though to be fair my belly was small and I didn’t have morning sickness… but discomfort with sleeping? Aversions to certain foods? Tired randomly? Feeling generally uncomfortable? Yep, I was used to that all already).
  • In effort to control my flares, I am constantly open to trying new things (though my wallet isn’t!).
  • When I first came up to visit Jake, before we were dating, we had an honest conversation about eczema and I told him how bad it gets for me, and he still wanted to be with me. To this day, I’ve never had insecurity about my skin around him.
  • I have learned to really appreciate the good days. As a result, I’m generally even happier of a person.
alternative/holistic medicine, eczema, food and nutrition, my journey, skin care

korean skin care for eczema

BoysOverFlowers_A5GLDKW.jpg

A few years back I came across an article about how a woman named Kathleen Hou managed to keep her eczema in check by using Korean skin care routines/products. Naturally I was intrigued, but the level of steps involved was so daunting to me (I tended to be a frolics-in-the-sun-and-to-h*ll-with-my-skin kind of girl before my eczema got bad), that I never bothered to try it out.

Well, I was watching a Korean drama the other day (comment the name of that drama pictured above if you know it!) and was again struck by how flawlessly nice all of the actors’ skins were, including the men. Being in a TSW phase I felt like a flaky snake in comparison and decided to rethink about trying Korean skin care to see if it could help me. My sister reminded me of the article by Kathleen Hou, so I followed up with checking out her company Peach and Lily and began more seriously looking at the section titled The Best Korean Skin Care Routine.

However, Korean skin care routines are amazing and intense and I’m not ready to commit to that level of time a day or money involved to get the products. So in lieu of going fully into it, I’ve decided to try my own proxy way for a month or so.

My routine is as followed. Every morning I take a shower (still I do a fairly warm to hot shower though I know it’s not optimal for my skin… baby steps) and I use a natural bar of soap that’s sold at whole foods. I can’t remember the specific brand but it’s got calendula and chamomile in it.
After that I use cotton balls to apply a toner to my whole body. I’ve been using the Thayer brand that makes witch hazel infusions (I’ve tried lavender and am currently using a cucumber one) but now I am leaming towards making my own toners so I made a basil one yesterday (it’s got a little bit of witch hazel in it too). The recipe I used is here. My toner came out like this: Screen Shot 2018-08-03 at 8.56.26 AM.png

Then I apply a moisturizer. Right now I have been alternating every now and then between Exederm and and MG217. Eventually I’ll get around to giving it a go at making my own, but I’ll do it after I try this for a month.

Source for the cover photo is here.

 

alternative/holistic medicine, distraction, eczema, exercise and activity, food and nutrition, my journey, pregnancy, skin care, women's health

back after a hiatus

quote calligraphy under cup of lemon tea
Photo by Studio 7042 on Pexels.com

I essentially disappeared off the face of the earth almost two months ago. Things got a little chaotic what with prepping for the baby, the baby shower, having the baby, and then learning about life post-pregnancy.

And in tandem with all that was going on, to be honest I was thinking of discontinuing this blog. My reason was I didn’t think I could continue to come up with content about living life with eczema if didn’t somehow entail my career being related to eczema- but I have since reconsidered and am back with a plethora of thoughts, stories, and research on this condition that I’ll be sharing over time.

I’ve got a lot of fun things in store including:

  • what it’s like to deal with eczema when you have a newborn
  • antibiotics and eczema
  • why it’s hard to know what factors cause or alleviate eczema (aka why humans are not perfect subjects)
  • my love of the sun (but does it love me back?)
  • challenges to try including 30 days yoga (getting moving, tackling isometric holds, and getting that tissue stretch in)
  • rebounding for lymph drainage
  • addiction to picking my skin- how to break it
  • herbs and herbalism… when you want a break from reactionary allopathic medicine and just want to grow some greens
  • Prime Physique Nutrition’s Conquerer Eczema Academy
  • and more!

But  in the meantime I’ll give a general status update on my life.

I had the baby! We named her Fiona and she was born June 18th. She’s now 5 weeks old and her favorite thing to do is sleep on top of me.

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During the labor I was on antibiotics and postpartum I have been trying to keep my diet clean to stave off candida overgrowth, and have also been taking probiotic pills daily. I’ll talk more about that in my antibiotics post.

My current skin condition is interesting to say the least. Skin color-wise I was almost back to normal after Fiona’s birth, and appearance-wise too, though I still have wrinkly skin, and that got a bit worse after the birth. Lately my skin has been dry- but not the dry like ashy-so-put-on-some-lotion, and not the dry like I-am-a-snake-with-the-way-I-shed-so-much, but instead I’m at this weird dry where I have tough and rough skin that feels like I have developed an immature exoskeleton. It’s worse on my hands and feet, and then my legs and parts of my arms. I’ve somehow managed to keep it relatively at bay on my face and neck (which is so important because I’ve noticed when the skin gets bad there, my emotional health drops the quickest). I hate to admit it, but I have definitely been scratching and picking at this new annoying exoskeleton, which hasn’t been the best for appearance (or skin barrier) because I now have a lot of scabs and scar marks. I definitely need to work on not picking my skin. I am extremely thankful that my chest has been relatively unaffected, as I am breastfeeding Fiona and it would be exponential harder (and I would be more worried about her getting an infection from my skin) if I was flared there.

Anyway, that’s more or less the basics of where I’m at now. Stay tuned over the next few weeks for posts about the content I mentioned above!

eczema, NEA, skin care, topical steroid withdrawal, travel/traveling

my eczema travel wishlist

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As the movement of creating more open dialogue around living with eczema grows, more and more events and opportunities are flourishing to help spread the word too.

My top 5 choices of places/events/conferences/camps/programs I would want to attend include:

  • Eczema Expo: Created by the National Eczema Association, this event brings together patients, caregivers, medical professionals, and product makers all to talk and connect over eczema. They even give you an idea of what the trip is like here. It just seems like a Renaissance Faire for sufferers of eczema and I’d love to go next year (hopefully it’s in Maryland or Massachusetts one year though!).

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  • Camp Wonder: This is an amazing program run by the Children’s Skin Disease Foundation that allows children to experience camp despite their skin conditions. I would love to be a counselor one day!

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  • Avène Hydrotherapy Center: First of all, this center is in the south of France, which is a beautiful land I long to re-visit. The spring supposedly was discovered to have healing properties when a Marquis’ horse was cured of pruritus after a few swims.  In time a hydrotherapy center and dermatological lab were built there, and so far, the testimonials of people getting treated there are beyond promising. Plus, like I said before, south of France. Be still my heart. Note: Avène also has US product lines now.

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  • Hannan-Chuo Hospital – A hospital in Japan thats dermatology department is run by Dr. Sato, who does a lot of research and treating of topical steroid withdrawal. You check in as a patient for a few months, and come out cured apparently. Unfortunately his blog is only in Japanese, but I’ll link it here for you multilingual individuals).
  • The Dead Sea – I hear its mud/water has some amazing healing properties due to its salts. It seems like many companies have turned the mud/water into packable salts for medicinal cosmetic lines, for example making bath soaks and other products, but I would love to be able to go there one day and just roll around for myself in the sea.

Other random events and classes that would pique my interest if I came across them and make me want to up and travel would be:

  • yoga retreats for skin sufferers
  • skin herbal remedy classes
  • book chats by writers with eczema
  • eczema in the arts conventions
  • eczema rehabs

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).