all posts, miscellaneous, the eczema body

healing skin, hormones, and hot nights

fire wallpaper
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

It’s currently 3am and I’m awake despite the little one actually having been asleep since 830ish.

“Why on earth are you awake?”, you may be asking yourself, and rightly so.

Well let me tell you, internet reader. I am hot.

Now though the ambient temperature in the room feels cool, I know I set my thermostat a bit high (in my defense, with the skin disorder I’m usually always freezing, and the baby likes it warm too). However, I am not sweating. I’m just really warm. Warm enough to sleep in just a t-shirt and underwear, which I haven’t done since before my skin declared mutiny on my body (circa 20013?).

So as I’m over here pondering my existence in a semi-lucid state at 3 in the morning, the question that keeps popping up on the forefront of my mind is: this heat, what does this mean?

What does this mean? I’ve got a few theories.

  1. My skin has shown an unprecedented amount of healing lately. I have soft skin on my face, stomach, back, and thighs. Perhaps I have done the majority of my topical steroid withdrawal pemance and am finally seeing the results, aka having skin of normal thickness and elasticity and with the ability to retain heat and moisture.  Maybe. Or, maybe,
  2. I have finally hit the point where, despite still breastfeeding (which can delay this), my hormones are kicking back in, and I am soon to rejoin the ranks of menstruating-aged women. In which case, hormones could be the culprit for my heated sleep body. Or, perhaps,
  3. My circadian rhythm is so butchered from having to wake up at all manner of times during the night shift for the last 7 months (more if you count pregnancy months too) that my body doesn’t know what to do with un-externally regulated sleep interruptions, and so in a desperate attempt to keep its new status quo, it’s driving me awake via continued thermoregulation fluctuations. Maybe that’s it.

Or maybe it’s some culmination of the three of those things because as is often the case with complex systems like humans, we don’t always have a simple solution.

At any rate, I’m enjoying the fact that my little one is getting so much sleep, and that I’m getting some silky smooth patches of skin. I’m not stressed and as I am awake I am making sure to hydrate, so I’m sure in time I’ll learn to sleep again. So c’est la vie et bonne nuit (that’s life and good night).

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all posts, eczema hacks, the eczema body, women's health

will my baby have eczema?

smiling baby lying on white mat
Photo by Victoria Borodinova on Pexels.com

A while back I wrote a post about what it’s like to have eczema and be pregnant, followed by another post after my little one was born all about living life with eczema and a baby. But today’s topic isn’t about the mom, but rather, about the baby and the baby’s risk of inheriting eczema from his/her parents.

The inspiration for this post comes from the eczema community on instagram. Many ladies have been asking about this topic, so I figured I would try to search for an answer. I apologize if it isn’t the clearest of posts. It’s a culmination of a bunch of witching hour moments over a few days, when Fiona decided that midnight, 1am, 2am, 3am, etc are equally important times to wake up each day.

Most of us know that there is a genetic component to eczema but what does that actually mean? There are a few different ideas being studied about where genes come into play with this condition that are lumped under the “outside-inside model” which look at skin barrier dysfunction (as opposed to the “inside-outside model”, which is about the gut health). Some examples of the outside-inside model, which I’ll go over individually, include:

  • FLG (a gene, that makes the protein filaggrin). I mentioned this protein in an older post, talking about how there were treatments for eczema being developed that made use of it. The gist was that a loss-of-function in the specific gene results in less filaggrin being made, and filaggrin is an essential player in keeping the skin barrier intact.
  • Tmem79/Matt (colloquially known the Matted mutant gene, so named because in mice it results in their fur having a matted look). Researchers found that mice that had this mutant MATT gene also had skin barrier issues and dermatitis issues, and that humans had a similar gene, with a common single nucleotide polymorphisms (or SNP). When there is a misstep (or a mistake) in humans’ SNP, there are significant atopic dermatitis associations.
  • Th2 (a cytokine, or a protein that impacts cell signaling). Th stands for T helper cells, and they help with host defense, but also impact inflammation. Some, like Th2 are know for being (pro)inflammatory, while Th1 is known to be anti-inflammatory. I mentioned this a little when talking about pregnancy and eczema. Research from 2015 showed there are many different Th types, that all may have their own impact on inflammation.
  • interleukin-1 (a protein from a family of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines). Many studies are still showing that breastfeeding reduces your child’s risk of eczema, because of some components (interleukin-beta specifically) in the breast milk that the child consumes. One such study went so far as to say that breastfeeding halves the risk for children between 0 and 3 years of age (and no you don’t have to breastfeed for 3 years for that to be the case!). The way interleukins work is that they are released when there is bacteria or immunological disturbances. The interleukins show up and affect cells like capillary endothelial ones, making them release chemicals and attract monocytes (large white blood cells that help kill bacteria). The problem with these is that certain types can be associated with Th2 (like IL-22 which is made by Th-22), or they can be known to be associated with inflammatory diseases like IL-17.

Then there has been a lot of research investigating if and how probiotics can help prevent eczema for babies too (even Gerber makes probiotic-included products now). In particular, Lactobacillus rhamnosus was seen to have mixed results, with some studies showing it reduced genetic susceptibility to eczema (meaning it somehow calms the baby’s risk of having eczema) for children with thirty-three eczema susceptibility SNPs. On the flip side, other studies said Lactobacillus rhamnosus had no effect on reducing the child’s risk of eczema.

To be honest, I am still a bit skeptical of the studies done that show no effect because, from what I can tell, they have the parents give the babies probiotics for say 6 months, and then continue to see if there is a benefit at some later date like 2 years of age. If a modern western diet (high carb, especially in refined sugars) can alter an adult’s gut microbiome fairly rapidly, why would the probiotics a baby takes at 6 months still be helping the gut at 2 years (the biome diversity would have changed due to diet by then, and the gut must stay healthy for it to help the skin)? Wouldn’t one expect the gut microbiome diversity to change and said “good” gut bacteria to not be able to survive the environment anymore?

So essentially I am still thinking, as the studies show no negative effects of taking probiotics, after talking with your baby’s pediatrician of course, what would be the harm in giving your baby probiotics? That and making sure to keep your baby on a diet that creates a gut environment more conducive to good bacteria flourishing.

Also note, I wasn’t able to access the whole study so I’m not sure how the probiotics were administered unfortunately. On a tangent, that’s always a frustrating point to me. I don’t think studies should cost the public to access because we should want to encourage people furthering their health in any way possible. I understand scientists need go make money too but I do wish there was another way besides charging subscriptions to databases of research. 

But I digress. So what is the takeaway for all those future mamas worrying about passing eczema on to their children? Do they have cause for concern? Perhaps. The way I see it (noting I could be interpreting this incorrectly) is for:

  • filaggrin: If the loss of function filaggrin gene is passed on, the child would probably have an increased risk.
  • Th2: the Th1/Th2 dominance seems to be more dependent on estrogen than genetics (though I could be wrong) so my guess would be that having a girl would make her more susceptible in that case (again I definitely could be wrong).
  • MATT gene: The atopic dermatitis shows up is because of that misstep (mistake) in the common SNP of the gene. As a result I think the answer is yes, it probably is a risk for one’s children, because missteps (I believe) would be passed down since they are mutations.
  • interleukins: I believe the pro-inflammatory ones that are problematic are a product more so of consistent stressors on the body (both from invaders like bacteria, and from literal stress). If the baby/child is relatively healthy and isn’t too stressed out, in tandem maybe with the mom breastfeeding her baby (so long as she is able to, aka isn’t on chemotherapy or radiation or something), then I do think the risk of eczema from this perspective, is decreased.

But the real question now is how do all these components balance out in an individual, in a baby? Does having a loss of function filaggrin gene guarantee a lifetime of eczema? Or does it just make you more susceptible but you are fine if you don’t have the MATT gene’s SNP misstep (or one of the other 33 SNPs mentioned that are related to eczema susceptibility)? It would be interesting to see a study done that investigates all these components together, so we could know which are still present when you have people with severe eczema, topical steroid withdrawal systems, etc. As for the initial question, sure, there are genetic components that you pass down to your baby, but it seems like not all the heavy hitters are genetic so your baby may still be fine.

One more thing to leave you with: the American Academy of Dermatology made a post a while back saying a few ways to reduce your baby’s chance of eczema (minus genetics naturally), which included:

  • having a dog at home before the child’s 1st birthday
  • moisturizing a newborn’s skin
  • not eliminating a bunch of things in your diet
  • eating a health diet while pregnant, and
  • breastfeeding (and having a healthy diet during it too)

All in all, know this: if you do have a baby and he/she has eczema, the research body is growing in the field and more understanding of what causes eczema are coming to light, which means better ways to treat it will follow.

REFERENCES

Bauer SM. Atopic Eczema: Genetic Associations and Potential Links to Development Exposures. International Journal of Toxicology. 2017 Mar 30: 36(3): 187-198.

Cabana MD, McKean M, Caughey AB, Fong L, Lynch S, Wong A, Leong R, Boushey HA, Hilton JF. Early Probiotic Supplementation for Eczema and Asthma Prevention: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatrics. 2017 Sep; 140(3).

“Can anything prevent my child from getting eczema?” America Academy of Dermatology, https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/eczema/prevent-my-child-from-getting-eczema. Accessed 9 Jan 2019.

Hofmann A, Kiecker F, Zuberbier T. A systematic review of the role of interleukin-17 and the interleukin-20 family in inflammatory allergic skin diseases. Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2016 Oct; 16(5): 451-457.

“Interleukin 1.” R&D Systems 1999, https://www.rndsystems.com/resources/articles/interleukin-1. Accessed 18 Dec 2018.

Jepsen AA, Chawes BL, Carson CG, Schoos A-MM, Thysen AH, Waage J, Brix S, Bisgaard H. High breast milk IL-beta level is associated with reduced risk of childhood eczema. Clinical & Experimental Allergy. 2016 Jun 2; 46(10): 1344-1354.

McLean WHI. Filaggrin failure – from ichthyosis vulgaris to atopic eczema and beyond. Britist Journal of Dermatology. 2016 Sept 26; 175(52): 4-7.

Morgan AR, Han DY, Wickens K, Barthow C, Mitchell EA, Stanley TV, Dekker J, Crane J, Ferguson LR. Differential modification of genetic susceptibility to childhood eczema by two probiotics. 2014 Aug 21; 44(10): 1255-1265.

Raphael I, Nalawade S, Eagar TN, Forsthuber TG. T cell subsets and their signature cytokines in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Cytokine. 2015 July; 74(1): 5-17.

Saunders SP, Goh CSM, Brown SJ, Palmer CNA, Porter RM, Cole C, Campbell LE, Gierlinski M, Barton GJ, Schneider G, Balmain A, Prescott AR, Weidinger S, Baurecht H, Kabesch M, Gieger C, Lee Y, Tavendale R, Mukhopadhyay S, Turner SW, Madhok VB, Sullivan FM, Relton C, Burn J, Meggitt S, Smith CH, Allen MA, Barker JNWN, Reynolds NJ, Cordell HJ, Irvine AD, McLean WHI, Sandilands A, Fallon PG. Tmem79/Matt is the matted mouse gene and is a predisposing gene for atopic dermatitis in huma subjects. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2013 Nov; 132 (5): 1121-1129.

all posts, miscellaneous, the eczema body

hello 2019!

photo of person holding sparkler
Photo by Malte Lu on Pexels.com

Hello hello and welcome to a new year!

I promptly abandoned my blog for a few weeks because things got crazy. We found an apartment in the city (the city proper! I’ve never lived in a city city before), got all the background checks done, hosted my parents and Jake’s parents and my sister for Christmas, packed up the house and moved out (more or less), moved into our new place, and have been rearranging and unpacking and cleaning it since. It’s a bit of a downsize from our house (but that’s not saying much as our house was huge for us) so we’ve had to get rid of lots of stuff. It’s shocking how much extra junk you accumulate just because you have the space. We are taking measures to not repeat that behavior in the apartment, and its smaller size should help.

How have you all been? How is your skin fairing?

For me personally I had a few waves of flares but now I am officially in another flake out phase. I got some idiopathic hives the other day, which according to this study, are signs of healing, along with excessive sweating. I am finding myself to be sweatier at night and sometimes randomly during the day so hopefully that bodes well. Also my skin is getting more soft and skin-like again. Even Jake has noticed. This feels quite exciting!!

I’ve been thinking a lot of about healthcare and treatments for eczema, and medicine as a field in general when I came across this article from 2014 done by the National Eczema Association that embodied some of my thoughts about the care around topical steroid withdrawal (or topical steroid addiction, TSA). The discussion section of the paper brought up a lot of interesting points, including:

Some patients believe their eczema will heal only if they never use TCS. In fact, this healing may happen because atopic dermatitis has a tendency of self-healing, and possibly TCS use may disturb this self-healing process… Did the number of patients with adulthood atopic dermatitis increase after dermatologists began to prescribe TCS several decades ago?

This is so important to think about because it does make you wonder if topical steroids are necessary to treat eczema early on (when it’s acute and not severe). Or have we as a species been warped into this idea of needing flawless-looking skin, causing us to apply whatever to our skin to make it look good, regardless of the consequences? If you think about it, we are the same species that has invented spray-on tans, skin whitening creams, chemical blemish removers, etc to use even when our skin is functionally perfect but does not meet the notions set in our head of what we believe we are dermally supposed to look like.

And the question of whether or not the number of people with AD has increased since the advent of TCS prescriptions is dead on with what I have been obsessed with trying to figure out. Now, I admit that I straddle a weird line in my head between being totally into medicine and its innovations for human health, and being a completely off-the-charts ‘let’s return to nature, cuz nature knows best’, roll -around-in-the-mud-to-build-up-your-immunity type person. Yes, it’s a confusing place in my mind, but in reality it just makes me question anytime anyone on either end of the medicinal spectrum (allopathic to holistic) tells me “this is the right thing to do”.

As such, I still wonder if our species’ conquest to protect ourselves from the baddest of bad germs, and our inventions of things like pasteurization and homogenization, have unintentionally messed us up because we are now too sterile and our bodies don’t spend the necessary time attacking pathogens, and instead have all this time to turn on us, and find fault in things they shouldn’t find fault with, with each successive generation feeling it worse and worse.

But how do I reconcile these kinds of thoughts in my own head? Do I only drink raw cow’s milk, and refuse to drink anything commercially produced FDA-approved milks? No. Does it mean I try to create a balance of bacteria by including less commercial and sterile food and drinks in my diet (e.g. kombucha, kefir, sauerkraut, yogurt)? Yes.

With the skin stuff, a similar attitude prevails. Lots of sources say you shouldn’t take hot or long showers/baths, and that you shouldn’t even bathe daily especially if you are trying to let your skin heal (since bathing is innately drying to the skin). This goes against the common cultural attitude that we as humans should be bathing everyday and it’s gross if you don’t. Does this mean I question when people tell me I need to shower daily, even after I’ve done nothing but sit on a couch for a day and haven’t sweat at all? Yes. Does it mean I refuse to shower for days at a time, even when I know I smell bad or have exerted myself and sweated? No.

I personally do shower daily these days, mostly to help rid myself of dry skin that’s flaking off. However, I rarely use soaps (too harsh on my skin), and instead I bathe in various things a few times a week (apple cider vinegar, really diluted bleach, epsom salt, etc). Actually, I’ll tell you a secret. Neither me nor my husband uses shampoo or conditioner anymore. I’m mixed race, so my hair is dry anyway and shampoo has always been a cultural no-no, but my husband is white and at first his hair was greasy when he discontinued shampoo. But now, it’s not. Over time his hair adjusted as his scalp stopped producing so much oil since he wasn’t constantly washing it away. Neat huh?

Also, though I won’t flesh out the details unless it happens, I also have something new in mind for the Feral Scribbler. Call it a New Year’s resolution… though it’s not tied to this year and isn’t a new idea, and I don’t really do new year resolutions… but besides all that, it is definitely something exciting. So cross your fingers for the surprise to be realized and stay tuned. My only hint is it would potentially address an idea from within today’s post.

And with that mystery instated, I bid you adieu and wish you well into our new year.

 

REFERENCES

Fukaya M, Sato K, Sato S, Kimata H, Fujisawa S, Dozono H, Yoshizawa J, Minaguchi S. Topical steroid addiction in atopic dermatitis. Drug Healthc Patient Saf. 2014; 6: 131-138.

Sheary B. Topical corticosteroid addiction and withdrawal – An overview for GPs. Australian Family Physician. 2016 Jun; 45(6): 386-388.

the eczema body, treatments

let’s get receptive: the relationship between pain and itching

black and brown coat animal on brown trunk
Photo by Flickr on Pexels.com

When I was still in my physical therapy graduate program, we had a lecture on pain and neural pathways, and I stayed after class to ask the professor about the relationship between pain and itching because I noticed my itches sometimes felt like they traveled along a nerve (such a perk of being a PT student, you’ve got to know your nerve branchings!).

I’m reading this book now called Living with Itch by doctors Gil Yosipovitch and Shawn G. Kwatra. This book first got on my radar when I was reading a National Eczema Association post called “Itching for Answers”, and it mentioned Dr. Yosipovitch and talked about how cytokines (one of the molecules secreted by the body’s immune cells that we usually blame for our overactive immune responses), are also located in the nerve cells. The thought is that some of the nerves may have “faulty wiring” and so they are constantly firing and sending up itch signals when there is low to no itchy stimuli.

Anyway, the book goes into detail about various chronic itch-related disorders/diseases as well as the anatomy behind the itch, and it depicts the relationship of pain and itching to be almost inverse. As the book explains, we have a bunch of different sensory receptors on our external body to send information from what we encounter in our environment to our brain. One such receptor type, located in the epidermis layer (the shallow most skin layer) is the C nerve fiber, which relays information about, you got it, pain and itching. These C nerve fibers send the sensation information to a structure called the dorsal root ganglion, and then the info crosses the spinal cord and goes up the opposite side of the lateral spinothalamic tract to get to the thalamus in the brain. There the thalamus sends info about the itch sensation to other parts of the body that link it to our physical, cognitive, and emotional responses. The lateral spinothalamic tract also relays information about pain and temperature, which is important and I’ll get to in a minute.

So what do we know about pain and itching? We know our bodies’ physical response to pain versus itch is very different. With pain, we withdrawal the part of the body that comes in contact with the painful stimuli; step on a nail, you immediately try to pull your foot away. But with an itch, we immediately go to a scratch reflex. The book goes into more detail about why that is, saying that the scratch reflex causes a sort of pain, which effectively masks the itch, and we now know that is precisely because the two stimuli types do share that same lateral spinothalamic tract. And because temperature also can share that tract, this is why using cold on inflamed skin, or taking a hot bath can also mute the itch.

Lastly, the book goes into why chronic pain and chronic itch can be similar. The biggest commonality is that both involve the nerve fibers being overactive, so we perceive the pain/itch to be even more intense (this is called hyper sensitization). And yes, when the sensations are that heightened, like say you are always itchy due to eczema or another condition, something that should be painful like an electric shock, or pouring rubbing alcohol on your scratch wounds (the latter which I’ve done…) might just make you itch more!

The most recent medications/treatments on the market are called biologics (and include names such as Dupixent), and they target the cytokines that give us so much grief. For eczema, those cytokines include interleukins 4 and 13 (IL-4 and IL-13) so far, and they are working to make treatments that target more ILs in the future.

One other takeaway from the book that I thought was relevant is that the epidermis layer, when sufficiently compromised (like after it’s been scratched a lot), can have more sensitive nerve fibers because they are more exposed by the broken skin barrier. So one important treatment in managing eczema is helping to try to repair and protect the skin barrier to subsequently protect the nerve fibers. The book mentions two ways of going about this:

  1. using moisturizers with ceramide in them to help coat the skin barrier as the skin barrier lacks the protein filaggrin*
  2. using moisturizers and cleansers that are more acidic so that they help get the skin back to its normal pH range of about 4-6 (with 1-6 being acidic, 7 being neutral, and 8-14 being alkaline). Note that most soap bars are alkaline.

*A cool way to know if you genetically are lacking filaggrin is to look at your palms. People with crazy amounts of lines are generally lacking filaggrin. I’ll be talking more about filaggrin in a post later this week. Meanwhile look at my lack of filaggrin below!

2018-10-26 13.12.40.jpg

What I am curious about is why then, is it advised by so many dermatologists to take bleach baths? I understand that when diluted, bleach can still help kill a lot of germs on the skin, but if bleach is a pH level around 12 (so pretty basic/alkaline and maybe gets diluted to around 9 when in a bath), it is very far from the desired pH of our skin. If we are adding an element that further changes our skin pH, how does that help our healing? Though I guess if the pH of our skin is higher than 9, bringing it down to 9 with bleach baths would be beneficial then too.

I haven’t searched super thoroughly yet, but the most recent study I found so far indicated that bleach baths with a course of topical steroids was no more effective than just doing the course of topical steroids alone. A review tested a treatment group using bleach baths and mupirocin (a topical antibiotic) versus a control group using normal baths and petroleum jelly and found that the former was more effective, at one month at reducing Staphylococcus aureus (the bad Staph we all know), but again this is not comparing bleach baths in isolation (and the study went on to say that at 3 months there was unchanged frequency of Staph in the treatment group meaning it was still as widespread on the body, though they didn’t test the concentration to see if the quantity of Staph had changed).

Yet another study supported that the topical antibiotics with diluted bleach baths were most efficient at killing Staph, yet also noted all groups (no bleach, bleach with topical antibiotics, etc) had reoccurrence rates of Staph after 4 months. A different review on using diluted bleach talked about how bleach is awesome because it’s a ubiquitous cheap house product that kills bacteria, viruses, and fungi alike and doesn’t cause bacteria to become resistant. However, then it also talks about why the studies using it for infected eczema are lacking, and includes reasons that one might one to avoid using it such as:

  • the amount in a cleaner can vary
  • its strength can degrade over time
  • it can make dermatitis worse
  • it often contains fragrances
  • the studies done didn’t have enough people in them, and
  • there is no consensus on the optimal amount of bleach to use or how frequently use it to effectively stave off future Staph infections.

And again, I’m not sure what the role of a diluted bleach bath would be for those of us avoiding topical steroids/going through withdrawal and not currently on antibiotics.
However, given the pH of bleach alone, and then adding the fact that so many studies mentioned the frequency of Staph reoccurrence, as my skin is going okay right now, I’ll personally be using apple cider vinegar baths more frequently instead.

Amended: This does not mean I no longer take bleach baths, because I still do. I just treat them as a more aggressive maintenance treatment for the management of my skin, and subsequently take them sparingly, but as needed.

 

REFERENCES

Barnes TM, Greive KA. Use of bleach baths for the treatment of infected atopic eczema. Australasian Journal of Dermatology. 2013 Nov; 54(4): 251-258.

Chang MW, Hirschmann JV. Bleach Baths for Atopic Dermatitis. NEJM Journal Watch Dermatology. 2009 Jun 5;(nd).

Crane, Margaret. “Itching for Answers.” National Eczema Association, https://nationaleczema.org/itching-for-answers/. Accessed 23 Oct 2018.

Fritz SA, Camins BC, Eisenstein KA, Fritz JM, Epplin EK, Burnham C Dukes J, Storch GA. Effectiveness of Measures to Eradicate Staphylococcus aureus Carriage in Patients with Community-Associated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections: A Randomized Trial. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2011 Sep; 32(9): 872-880.

Gonzalez ME, Schaffer JV, Orlow SJ, Gao Z, Li H, Alekseyenko AV, Blaser MJ. Cutaneous microbiome effets of fluticasone proprionate cream and adjunctive bleach baths in childhood atopic dermatitis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2016 Sep; 75(3): 481-493.e8.

Panther DJ, Jacob SE. The Importance of Acidifucation on Atopic Eczema: An Underexplored Avenue for Treatment. J Clin Med. 2015 May; 4(4):970-978.

all posts, the eczema body, treatments

there are germs on my skin! part 2

selective focus photography of person wearing three bangles
Photo by Godisable Jacob on Pexels.com

It’s my favorite time of year and I just received my Chuckling Goat package (but more on that in a bit).

2018-10-02 13.40.38

A few months back I wrote a post about the skin biome and how I was excited by the small movement of companies creating products geared towards helping it. Since then there have been developments about different companies creating products to help either work with the natural skin biome or to help reintroduce micro-diversity to create an appropriate balance for healthy skin.

I didn’t know it previously, but Johnson and Johnson had a movement a while back to create products that didn’t mess up the skin microbiome of babies’ skin. Such products, like Aveeno Eczema Therapy Moisturizing Cream have a trial indicating that they actually help to increase the microbiome diversity of the skin with use over time.

The company has become skin microbiome-focused in a multitude of ways, including offering use of their JLINX incubator under the JLABS. S-Biomedic has joined JLINX and is working to create products that remove the bad bacteria and replace it with good ones to balance out the diversity of the skin back to a healthy level. This idea of balance is becoming more and more accepted as it is found that overuse of antibiotics is causing more harm than good for conditions like eczema. Studies are showing that balanced diversity is what we need for our skin biome, rather than sterility (noting that antibiotics still have their place, including when surgery or infection is involved). Microbiome transplants are now no longer a thing of the future but are instead potentially the next big medical treatment protocol!

More recently, I read a book called The Good Skin Solution by Shann Nix Jones, that talked about the gut and skin microbiome and Jones’ personal experience as to how she came to develop a treatment to help manage her young son’s eczema. The goal was to help increase the diversity of both microbiome using the probiotics in kefir made from their goats’ milk. When it was a success with their son, her and her husband decided to sell their products and hence the Chuckling Goat business was born.

Jones reintroduced me the theory that you need to fix your gut microbiome to have any really lasting effect on your skin, but she added the idea that it’s best to treat both at the same time, (hence her her program that includes probiotics for both the skin and the gut). Needless to say I was intrigued so I looked into her products and went on to order some (but unfortunately I can’t get the kefir drinks because I live in the states and they don’t ship that outside of the UK).

Today the soaps and lotions arrived and I am beyond excited to receive them (happy as a clam… or a ceramic jack-o-lantern!). See my spoils below:

2018-10-02 13.40.42

I’ll have to figure out what to do to increase my gut flora diversity in lieu of kefir, as I was advised to avoid dairy while breastfeeding to see if that helped with Fi’s digestive woes. I’m not sure if goat milk would be okay since it is supposed to have less allergenic components than milk. I may just wait until Fi is done breastfeeding.

 

REFERENCES

Capone K, Klein SL, Kirchner F, Tierney N. “Effects of Topical Lotions on the Atopic Dermatitis Skin Microbiome and Associations with Itch and Skin Barrier Function.” 76th Annual Society for Investigatiev Dermatology (SID) Meeting, Portland, OR. 26-29 Apr, 2017. Poster presentation.

Myles IA, Earland, NJ, Anderson ED, Moore IN, Kieh MD, Williams KW, Saleem A, Fontecilla NM, Welch PA, Darnell DA, Barnhart LA, Sun AA, Uzel G, Datta SK. First-in-human topical microbiome transplantation with Roseomonas mucosa for atopic dermatitis. JCI Insight. 2018 May 3;3(9):e120608.

Parikh-Das A, Ganopolsky I, Nunez C, Moreira L. A clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a OTC colloidal oatmeal skin protectant cream in the management of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in infants and toddlers. JAAD. 2017 Jun 76(6);AB10.

Puniewska, Madgalena. “How the Microbiome Could Transform Your Skin in Surprising Ways.” Johnson&Johnson Innovation, 12 Oct. 2017, https://www.jnj.com/innovation/how-the-microbiome-could-transform-your-skin-in-surprising-ways.

 

all posts, the eczema body, treatments

using boob milk for more than the baby

agriculture animal blue sky breakfast
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

As some of you may know I am currently nursing my 3 month old baby girl, and in doing so as she is my first, I’ve learned that leaking is a thing (sometimes it occurs when she’s nursing on one side- the other side will start to drip milk, and other times they seem to leak for no apparently reason at all). As I wear nursing pads in my shirts during the day, the problem begins at night when I’m in bed trying to sleep. The leakage then can be really annoying. So my most recent solution has been spreading the milk on my skin, because why not- it’s already leaking all over it anyway.

My less impulsive logic for trying this experiment came from some research I had been doing a few weeks ago about breastmilk and its health benefits for the baby. Fi got sick and I wanted to know how her immature immune system could handle sickness when she only intakes breastmilk as her food source. This search led me to an internet viral photo showing how a mom’s breast milk changed when her infant got sick. The 2013 study mentioned in that post talks about breast milk’s immunological function and explains how when the mom or baby get sick, the number of leukocytes (aka white blood cells) in the breast milk drastically increases to help protect them, because leukocytes help fight disease (which I found to be such a cool example of symbiosis. I personally have also noticed that breastfeeding seems to keep both me and the baby from getting too severe of sicknesses. In fact, my mom, mother-in-law, and husband each got sick after the baby was born yet Fi and I were fine!).

I also read an article by NPR addressing the breastfeeding versus formula debate for poor countries.  A point it stated made me more curious about breast milk; it said formula can cause increased risks of diarrhea and respiratory infections. I assumed this is so because it requires using water to make (and clean sources are not always available in impoverished countries) but maybe it’s also because formula doesn’t have the same chemical and bacterial composition to allow it to be readily accepted by the baby’s developing digestive and immune systems? By extension I supposed that breast milk had to have some component in it that generally allows it to not irritate the digestive and immune systems*… which is my big sign to think “MICROBIOME” (* this of course is excluding when the baby has allergies or sensitivities to something the mom is eating that is going into her breast milk). The article also talked about how it’s weird that we are constantly trying to research the benefits of breastfeeding when it’s as natural as “breathing, chewing, hearing, passing stool”. But we live in a society where we need evidence and so I decided to play the game of informal (and badly controlled) science to see if I could test my own theory, that breast milk may help with (eczema) healing.

I did not participate in the rigors of the scientific process because I am lazy and I doubt Fi would be content amusing herself long enough for me to do it, but instead I just dabbed some breast milk on my shallow cuts every now and then instead of using neosporin or leaving the cut alone. My observations: it would seem as though breast milk can help with reducing the pain of shallow cuts (I tried it on the cracks on my knuckles and outer ears, cuts on my ankles and hands), and helps to speed up the healing of said cuts. It does not moisturize (the spots I put it on tended to be drier the next day… though that could be because when cuts heal on me, they start skin flaking…) but overall, the spots I put it on did seem to heal up and achieve a cleaner scab and softer skin around it.

Apparent cons of this experiment? The milk can sometimes burn (but again, everything burns when it touches my inflamed skin spots… even water) and it’s also a little sticky but it dries sticky-free. Fun fact, I have a pet peeve about being sticky. I hate it. So much.

After this self experiment, I was more curious to support why I might be seeing the results I saw so I did some low level cursory research. Also speaking of research, I received my diploma the other day. I officially have a Master of Science in Health Sciences from MGH Institute of Health Professions. I am now a MASTER of science. The academic title of master seems somewhat archaic; I envision myself similar in status to an entry-level alchemist or and mage, as I have established myself in a trade, but it will still take years to perfect my craft. Anyway…

There’s not a lot of recent research being done (or at least it’s not readily available yet) but I did come across two recent ones. This first paper, of which I could only access the abstract, tested wound healing of the cornea (yes, of the eye) in mice using human breast milk, milk from mice, artificial tears, and the control group. The results were that the human breast milk caused the fastest healing, followed by the mouse milk. The other two groups (artifucial tears and the control) were still not healed by the end of day two. The other study I found was published in 2015 in Nature, and it was titled, “Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of accuse inflammation”. It came to the conclusion that the lipid mediator-specializing proresolving mediator profile (a ratio of sorts between lipid mediators and specialized proresolving mediators) in human milk helped the macrophages (or cells that engulf bad bacteria) to contain pathogens and remove dead cells (in a process called efferocytosis- my word of the day). It is important to note that this was seen in vivo (in mice), and that breast milk was not applied topically to the skin. If the results are applicable to humans, I see this study as being useful because people with eczema suffer high levels of inflammation internally not just on their skin, and because turning off the inflammatory phase is also important in wound healing (more on this in a later post).

After that article I backtracked and wanted to know more about what breast milk is, which led me to this document that included the various components of breast milk (though I can not find the professor or the molecular virology lab anywhere else on the web…). Also note that the tables say the various factors are tested “in vitro” meaning not in the organism (for example, secretory IgA from breast milk was probably removed from breast milk and tested in a petri dish against E. coli). Even so, the breadth of potential abilities of breast milk, due to its staggering list of factors alone was interesting in its own right.

In conclusion, though I don’t think breast milk applied externally heals the mother’s eczema or TSW, I do think it can help me with superficial wounds, especially when it’s the middle of the night and I am otherwise unmotivated to leave the bed even if I’ve been scratching.

 

REFERENCES

Arnardottir H, Orr SK, Dalli J, Serhan CN. Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of acute inflammation. Mucosal Immunology. 2016, May 9;9(3):757-766.

Asena L, Suveren EH, Karabay G, Durson Altinors D. Human Breast Milk Drops Promote Coreanl Epithelial Wound Healing. Curr Eye Res. 2017 Apr;43(4):506-512.

Brink, Susan. “Why The Breastfeeding Vs. Formula Debate Is Especially Critical In Poor Countries.” Goats and Soda, https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/13/628105632/is-infant-formula-ever-a-good-option-in-poor-countries?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20180719&utm_campaign=goatsandsoda&utm_term=nprnews. Accessed 1 Oct 2018.

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how to handle a baby when you have eczema

white bed spread near a human foot during night time
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

For the first few days after having my little one, I was on such a high of nerves and adrenaline that I felt great!  I had been on antibiotics while in the hospital, and after getting home my skin started to feel really dry. I started taking some probiotics and focusing on drinking lots of water (I knew getting enough sleep was a lost cause), and keeping my stress down.

Initially, my skin was calm enough that I had no problem doing skin-to-skin contact with baby Fi, but around week 4 or so I started to experience more flare symptoms- sweating, itching, redness- whenever I had the baby lay on me for too long. I started to have to wear long sleeves when holding her to not get overheated. I’m not exactly sure when this happened, but it may have also correlated when the humidity increased, and the temperature with it.

I’m not sure if it was due to the antibiotics, the temperature, the lack of sleep, the terrible diet I had in the hospital (think chicken fingers and ice cream for multiple meals in a day), or the hormone fluctuations but my skin definitely became more sensitive post-pregnancy. Though estrogen has been considered one of the reasons women can flare-up worse during pregnancy (see my post about pregnancy and eczema), after pregnancy the estrogen drops so it’s unclear what would be provoking my symptoms (besides the above mentioned items).

Either way I’ve had to be more creative about adjusting to life with a newborn. The biggest aspect I’ve had to cultivate is endless patience mixed with quick stress-reduction habits. My lackadaisical approach to getting house and life stuff done has been somewhat of a saving grace because my little one has wreaked havoc on my schedule. I’m exhausted in the afternoons, I have no idea what it feels like to sleep more than 3 hours at a time anymore, I tend to eat a bit worse now (mostly eating too many carbs and too much) because I lack the self control to stay as dietarily balanced when I’m sleep deprived. It’s something I’ll have to work on in the coming months.

I find ways to not focus on my skin when it’s getting all sweaty from holding her and I have learned to wear light layers or wrap a small blanket between her and myself when breastfeeding to avoid irritating the more sensitive skin areas like my stomach.

There are some inherently awesome aspects to having a newborn when you have eczema (at least in my experience). For one, I tend not to think about myself as much so I am not as aware when I am itchy. She keeps me busy to such an extent that even when I’m immersing my hands in water (which is traditionally a huge irritant) to give her a bath, I barely notice. Also, lately my core temperature seems to be evening out even as my skin fluctuates (which means that the hot, sweaty skin nights and cold shivers have been decreasing). I actually enjoy the cold temperature more than I used to, and I don’t enjoy basking in the sun for quite as long.

And overall I do think that my skin has been able to consistently heal slowly but surely. I feel as though I look more or less human again, what with the redness decreasing.  I think the hormones from breastfeeding are helping my skin heal to some extent; I know my hair has gotten shinier, which is an awesome boon.