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yoga for the atopically inclined

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This is a post I initially wrote after talking about the different alternative medicines and their content. I never ended up posting it because I had the baby and promptly forgot I wrote it. But without further ado, here is a post that focuses a bit more on the physical aspects of one of those holistic practices; yoga.

Though I love exercising, I am no stranger to avoiding heavy aerobically-intense exercise because of the nasty skin side effects that occur during a flare (the flushing sensations, the heating skin, the sweating/wetness in flexor surfaces, the rashes, and the insatiable itching). One of the times I got the best reprieve from my flares and related skin symptoms was February of 2016 when I was doing a 200-hour yoga teacher training. I took anywhere from 1-3 classes, 5-7 days of the week in rooms with high temperatures and lots of humidity. As I breathed through new poses and slowly worked my muscles and  focused on breathing and meditation, I felt stronger and better day by day. I won’t say my eczema went away because it didn’t, but the movements and concentration on my breathing did help my skin improve a lot, and in February no less (usually the winter months are worse for my skin).  At the same time, practicing that much yoga naturally made me want to eat cleaner because I felt heavy if I tried to practice after eating unhealthy foods (so at the time I tried out the Whole 30 Diet).

As I tried to recover from the particular cold, damp prolonged and lingering last bit of the Northeast winter weather, I decided I wanted to make use of my teacher training and research the best exercises to promote blood flow, skin healing, and stress reduction. My goal? To help my own skin maintenance (and the skin of anyone else who wishes to try this routine). So first I’ll give a brief explanation of some the theories behind how yoga can help eczema. Then later in the post I’ll show a few poses that have been said to be most beneficial to add to a yoga practice (and mostly ones that a beginner could do) to help the skin.

From my teacher training I learned that in yoga, there are 7 major chakras, or energy cluster points, that line up with the spinal column where nadis, or channels intersect. These channels carry prana or our life force energy. Of the 7 chakras, each corresponding to a respective spot on our spinal column, the 3rd chakra, Manipura is said to be unbalanced when we see skin conditions like eczema. Manipura is located in the solar plexus and corresponds to physical body parts such as the detox organs (liver, spleen, etc). When this chakra is unbalanced, as in it is underactive, people may feel a lack of control or a tendency to withdrawal from social situations. Poses said to help invigorate this chakra include core strengthening poses such as those that entail isometric contractions, and breathing focus. This can include poses that entail twists (because they engage the core muscles to be able to do the poses well, and are said to help with detoxing).

So first off, does yoga truly help eczema? Well, some studies have show that it helps reduce inflammation after moderate to strenuous exercise. Others indicate it helps with the glycation process (mentioned in my post about sugar’s effects on eczema), by increasing the muscles’ glucose uptake, and therefore reducing blood sugar levels.

Yoga also entails a lot of focus on breathing (which can be beneficial for both getting you to distract your mind away from the itch and improving circulation of O2). It also often includes a meditative component, and meditation has also been seen to help eczema. It can be useful for reducing stress levels and improving sleep as well.

In general all of those effects would help alleviate a lot of the issues that eczema comes with, and personally I got more into yoga because it was one activity that didn’t induce worser flares for me. Plus getting a good night’s sleep is huge, since we do so much healing when we are catching some z’s.

Here is my take on poses for eczema, though most of these poses are somewhat “general” because they are known to help symptoms of eczema (such as inflammation, bad circulation, stress), aka they benefit the skin generally. Then again, there is no “cure” for eczema in isolation, so getting up and moving and in this case doing yoga will most likely help with eczema too.

Below are specific poses I found listed on various websites that were said to help the skin (with photos of me demonstrating! Note: I won’t demo the twists as I am over 8 months pregnant at the moment).

Livestrong.com suggests a lot of inversions (or poses with the head below the heart) including:

  • Legs Up a Wall (beginner friendly. I only stayed here for a few seconds to take this picture before getting off my back because it’s not the most comfortable when 38 weeks pregnant).

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  • Camel Pose (can be modified to be more beginner friendly. Note: keeping your hips pushing forward so they are lined over your knees. Also note that I am not reaching for my ankles because I am too pregnant to keep good form attempting that so I’m just reaching my arms downwards).

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  • Wheel (needs a level of back/hip flexor mobility… wouldn’t suggest it for pure beginners and I will update myself doing it when eventually).

From healthline.com we have asanas for beginners to yoga with the intent to decrease stress (in this case for psoriasis, but stress is stress):

  • Child’s Pose (my big toes are touching and my knees are out wide as the mat, and I am sinking my hips down and back while reaching my arms forward. Though I am limited to how far I can stretch downwards by the baby).

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  • Salutation Seal (never knew it was called this, but essentially you sit cross-legged, keep your back nice and tall, and bring your hands to your chest like you are praying).

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And lastly, a few from HolisticVanity who brings up poses to help with inflammation:

  • Seated Twist (again I’ll get around to adding this photo)
  • Revolved Chair (ditto this one)
  • Warrior 1  (note that my lower back has a lot of curvature here, which is not ideal. The baby is pulled me forward and it’s hard to compensate, but generally you want to reduce some of that low back curving to make sure you are setting yourself up for the best alignment to continue the safest practice).

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  • Chair (note: I have my feet hips width distance apart to accommodate the baby, but normally the feet are together will a little space between the heels. Also I need to relax my shoulders down more and pull my ribs in to have better form, but my ribs are also flared out because I’m 38 weeks pregnant!!).

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REFERENCES

Beri K. Breathing to younger skin: ‘reversing the molecular mechanism of skin aging with yoga’. Future Sci OA. 2016 June; 2(2): FS0112.

NEA. “Can Mediation Help Ease Eczema Itch?” National Eczema Association, https://nationaleczema.org/meditation-ease-eczemas-itch/. Accessed 30 Jul 2018.

Vijayaraghava A, Doreswamy V, Narasipur OS, Kunnavil R, Srinivasamurthy N. Effect of Yoga Practice on Levels of Inflammatory Markers after Moderate and Strenuous Exercise. J Clin Diagn Res. 2015 Jun;9(6):CC08-CC12.

Woodyard C. Exploring the therapeutic effects of yoga and its ability to increase quality of life. Int J Yoga. 2011 Jul-Dec;4(2):49-54.

Ziel, Erica. “The 5 Best Yoga Poses for Pregnancy and 4 to Avoid.” Livestrong, https://www.livestrong.com/article/332706-yoga-poses-avoid-during-pregnancy/. Accessed  30 Jul 2018.

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review: prime physique nutrition’s conquerer eczema academy

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I have been following Abby Lai, a registered holistic nutritionist, and the creator of Prime Physique Nutrition for a few years now. I remember first coming across her blog and being flabbergast that there were others who had this annoying condition to similar severities as myself; it made me feel less alone. She also is the creator of the first eczema podcasts.

Since then, her and Jen, the blogger behind Eczema Holistic Healing, have created the Conquerer Eczema Academy, which is an 8-week program they do that offers a wealth of options to the sufferers of eczema.

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For those new to the whole eczema issue, they have lots of information about what causes it, common treatments and ways to manage flares, how diet can impact your skin and flares, coping mechanisms, etc in the form of videos. The program includes a private Facebook group so the participants can find community with one another and get questions answered by Abby and Jen. There are weekly group video sessions where everyone can get online and feel the immediate impact of being part of a group and supported, as well as discuss various topics together.

All in all it’s a useful program. As Abby says, you get out of it what you put into it. She also says that the participants who have had the most success are the ones that attend the weekly video sessions.

I have to admit I’ve missed a few since the baby came (they are at 8:30pm for my time zone) but I think they are fine. I tend to not have the ability to sit still through a video chat, which is a personal problem, so I tend to prefer posting on the Facebook group more.

Overall I think it’s a useful program, especially if you are someone who feels you don’t have support or that no one understands what you are going through. The program has people who are at all stages of either TSW or eczema flares and so it is comforting to be able to talk through things with others, and compare where we are while rooting for one another.

Abby also offers individual coaching, though I didn’t try it so I’ve got no info about it.

If you’re interested, the link to the program is here.

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“i’ll be back”, and here i am!

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I essentially disappeared off the face of the earth almost two months ago. Things got a little chaotic what with prepping for the baby, the baby shower, having the baby, and then learning about life post-pregnancy.

And in tandem with all that was going on, to be honest I was thinking of discontinuing this blog. My reason was I didn’t think I could continue to come up with content about living life with eczema if didn’t somehow entail my career being related to eczema- but I have since reconsidered and am back with a plethora of thoughts, stories, and research on this condition that I’ll be sharing over time.

I’ve got a lot of fun things in store including:

  • what it’s like to deal with eczema when you have a newborn
  • antibiotics and eczema
  • why it’s hard to know what factors cause or alleviate eczema (aka why humans are not perfect subjects)
  • my love of the sun (but does it love me back?)
  • challenges to try including 30 days yoga (getting moving, tackling isometric holds, and getting that tissue stretch in)
  • rebounding for lymph drainage
  • addiction to picking my skin- how to break it
  • herbs and herbalism… when you want a break from reactionary allopathic medicine and just want to grow some greens
  • Prime Physique Nutrition’s Conquerer Eczema Academy
  • and more!

But  in the meantime I’ll give a general status update on my life.

I had the baby! We named her Fiona and she was born June 18th. She’s now 5 weeks old and her favorite thing to do is sleep on top of me.

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During the labor I was on antibiotics and postpartum I have been trying to keep my diet clean to stave off candida overgrowth, and have also been taking probiotic pills daily. I’ll talk more about that in my antibiotics post.

My current skin condition is interesting to say the least. Skin color-wise I was almost back to normal after Fiona’s birth, and appearance-wise too, though I still have wrinkly skin, and that got a bit worse after the birth. Lately my skin has been dry- but not the dry like ashy-so-put-on-some-lotion, and not the dry like I-am-a-snake-with-the-way-I-shed-so-much, but instead I’m at this weird dry where I have tough and rough skin that feels like I have developed an immature exoskeleton. It’s worse on my hands and feet, and then my legs and parts of my arms. I’ve somehow managed to keep it relatively at bay on my face and neck (which is so important because I’ve noticed when the skin gets bad there, my emotional health drops the quickest). I hate to admit it, but I have definitely been scratching and picking at this new annoying exoskeleton, which hasn’t been the best for appearance (or skin barrier) because I now have a lot of scabs and scar marks. I definitely need to work on not picking my skin. I am extremely thankful that my chest has been relatively unaffected, as I am breastfeeding Fiona and it would be exponentially harder (and I would be more worried about her getting an infection from my skin) if I was flared there.

Anyway, that’s more or less the basics of where I’m at now. Stay tuned over the next few weeks for posts about the content I mentioned above!

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love is more than skin deep

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One aspect that sucks about eczema is how detrimental it can be for finding love. A large part of our society, for better or worse, may notice visual aspects of a person such as our skin first, and having rashes and redness that many people perceive to be contagious doesn’t help much when you’re on the market. Also, even if people aren’t noticing our skin, we may think they are and be more self conscious or less confident because of our own insecurities and perceptions.

Though it can see hopeless at times, there are many people out there who do suffer from eczema (or other visible skin conditions) that find love and prove that most people do see more than skin-deep.

The National Eczema Association had a post a while back that featured a few individuals sharing their stories about their experience with having eczema and dating, marriage, and intimacy, and how they manage to live happily ever after. The post also mentioned the character traits that the interviewees found most desirable in their partners: “openness, honesty, and authenticity”.

My own experience with eczema and romance has been fairly tame. I didn’t date until I was about 20, and when I first had the global skin flare my junior year of college I just retreated into my room for the most part and focused on how to deal with school rather than focusing on romance. I think at the time I was stressed enough by school in general that dating wasn’t really on my mind, and if it was I assumed my weird personality would be more of a deterrent than my skin. Though, when I was on oral steroids and antibiotics I remember going out a lot more and being a lot more flirty in general because my skin felt better. I think personally I just shifted wildly between hiding when I was flaring badly, to going out and being extremely social when my skin was under control. My skin was a bit bad after I graduated when I was working as a physical therapy aide back in Maryland, but I think I combatted that era of life by eating better and being freakishly active. I went out dancing a lot, but also ran every day and enjoyed hours in the sun. I also generally have an easier time with the visible skin issues in the warmer months, so even though I still slept poorly, I felt more comfortable in public with my skin because I knew it wasn’t as noticeable to others. When I started dating Jake, I remember the first night I stayed over his place I asked him why he kept his socks on all the time (even when the apartment was heated), and he said he had bad eczema that looked really gross. I told him I had eczema too and that he shouldn’t have to hide his feet and made him take off his socks. When my flares inevitably came back and plagued my entire body I did have moments where I felt really insecure I’d flood him with a whole host of questions. Do you want to be with me if I never heal? If I’m always flaky? If I’m always stressed by my skin? If I never want to go out anywhere? If some days I can’t cuddle with you? I’d ask him: why do want to be with someone who’s face was also dry, swollen and puffy? I am not pretty- I don’t even have skin! He always answered that I was beautiful and that my skin wasn’t want made me beautiful, and that yes, he wanted to be with me even if I never healed, we’d just learn to cuddle with sheets between us, and that he believed I would heal and it would just take a while and there would be good days and bad. Eventually I stopped having the insecurities around my skin and our relationship, and generally I don’t worry about that even if my flares are bad, which I think has helped us get much better at handling them. So in my experience, it just takes finding the right person, and eczema doesn’t impact that.

In regards to the experience of others, Abby Lai (of Prime Physique Nutrition) had a post and video a while back about dating when you have eczema that covered a lot of her own personal experience as well as advice to both the person with eczema as well as the partner.

I also came across a post by Shelly Marie, a blogger of eczema who did interviews with her parents and her boyfriend about how her eczema affects them. I thought it was a really cool idea, and so for this post, I asked my husband some of the questions.

 

Interview with Jake:

How long have you known me?

  • 6 years

What were your first impressions of me?

  •  Funny and incredibly genuine. A very caring and intelligent person. Also, hot.

Could you see that I had a visible skin condition? If so, what were your opinions on it?

  • No but I became aware of your skin history early on.

Did do you know what eczema was?

  • Yes, I have it.

Do you understand more about eczema now since we’ve been together?

  • Yes absolutely. We even do research together now.

Has my eczema ever affected me more than physically?

  • Yes, it is a stressful disorder that has at various times lead to compulsions, fear, chronic sadness, and stress.

What are your opinions on eczema and mental health?

  • The former can lead to problems with the latter.

Has my eczema ever come in-between our relationship?

  • Not exactly, though at times it has made some common/everyday things difficult, like prolonged physical contact, temperature control, going out and socializing, and eating.

How does my skin affect you?

  • It worries me when you aren’t feeling well. I internalize your stress and just want you to feel better. It hurts me to see you in pain.

Have you ever had a bad experience with my skin? If so, what was that and how did you help resolve it?

  • Yes. During dry out periods the flaking can be extreme and requires diligent house/car cleaning routines. During really bad flares, we need to almost entirely avoid physical contact. Hoodies and blankets help with that!

When I have a bad flare up eczema how does that affect me from your point of view?

  • It stresses you out and is deeply frustrating to you. It restricts common activity, and makes you worry about causality, especially dietary causes.

Do you think there is enough help out their for sufferers with a skin condition? If not, how do you think this can be changed?

  • No, there isn’t. The biggest thing that needs to change right now is overprescription of corticosteroids. Doctors almost universally address symptoms and not causes of this disorder. There needs to be an increase in education on the relationship between lifestyle and systemic inflammation. Such a relationship is known to exist and doctors should address the root causes of inflammation long before risking potentially permanent damage via misuse and overuse of prescriptions.

What would your advice be to others who are in a relationship with someone who has eczema (or any other condition)?

  • It’s important to keep in mind that this is a manageable condition and to be incredibly observant of any behaviors and habits that correlate to flares.

 

So there’s a taste of what it can feel like for the person on the other side of the eczema curtain.

I’ll leave you with the immortal ever-applicable words of India Arie, “I am not my hair, I am not my skin, I am the voice that lives within”.

 

REFERENCES

Crane, Margaret. “Happily ever after (with eczema).” National Eczema Association, https://nationaleczema.org/happily-ever-eczema/. Accessed 21 May 2018.

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exercise is medicine… for skin?

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A few years ago when I was living in Maryland, I was volunteering with the Montgomery County Bone Builders program. It was a group that offered community classes to adults aged 55+ to help build bone density and reduce osteopenia risk via group weight lifting. Needless to say, I enjoyed it immensely. Well, the other day I came across some notes I took from a continuing education course I took while volunteering, on exercise as medicine. As usual, I started thinking about what I had learned but now with the framework eczema. And thus I will now gift you all with my self ramblings. Not all of the bone building notes are relevant to eczema but whatever random thoughts I did have I’ll put in lavender.

 

2016 – Seminar

“Exercise is Medicine: The explosion of information today” presented by Professor Karen Thomas (a professor of exercise physiology at Montgomery College)

Exercise as Medicine – “Move”

NIH study at Brigham’s and Women’s Hospital stated that done right, there is no higher injury rate than college-aged person even when lifting heavy weight at few reps for people in nursing homes

Strength Training – use it or lose it (every day a person lies flat, as when ill, they lose 4% fitness) – So those days of relative immobilization from large flares are drastically messing up our health! 

–       muscles have 3 types of fibers:

o   ongoing = type I, slow endurance

o   strong = type II, fast

o   fibers that can go either way

–       lose strength fibers with age – body reabsorbs unused fibers and one can never get them back – It would be interesting to see if there are any correlations of increased (or decreased) incidents of eczema with lost muscle strength fibers with age

–       when exercising want to work all major muscles but especially rhomboids for older adults  

o   arms down at side, thumbs pointed out (rhomboids engaged) = can’t slouch – Finding ways to keep optimal “no slouching” positions are important also for allowing a more consistent flow of our fluids (lymph, blood, etc). 

–       some “old age” symptoms are actually just a product of lack of strength

–       need strong core (but also flexible) to protect everything else (e.g. low back) – A strong core is also important for blood flow and healthy digestion, which are crucial parts to helping our skin heal 

–       need to train people how to move in all directions (train to do activities of daily living) – Good to get lymph moving! 

humans gain muscles at same rate no matter age (so long as fibers not lost)

–       large mental component (which ties into a lot of studies in psychology about how ageism affects people’s memories and abilities… in short, if you think you can’t do something, you make it so you can’t do it)  – The mentality behind skin issues has been highly studied. Meditation, distraction, etc are all seen to help with itch sensation reports

low back pain often caused by muscle weakness

–       leg strength – e.g. squats (we also looked at how people can cheat when going to sit or get up from a chair, as by rocking themselves forward to get up or letting themselves just fall onto the chair rather than engaging their leg muscles)

Bone Density (need enough Ca2+, vitamin D and movement) – similar things we need for skin health

(bone replaces entirely every 3 years)  – skin replaces entirely every 30 days for the average person, or so my doctor told me

–       to get Ca2+ into bone, need negative charge in bone

–       bone bending/moving makes static electric charge that pulls Ca2+ into bone if vitamin D enzyme present – it would be interesting to the study the chemical reactions/absorption rates of products on the skin, moisture, etc during exercise. That and if the collagen levels in the skin change with exercise. And also what is happening chemically with the skin cells when they are inflamed and when they die/new ones are created. Looks like I need to get into skin physiology soon.

–       body parts you move, strengthen – if moving the skin helped strengthen it… that could explain why massages tends to be good for us (besides the stress component? I wonder if they have studies on the affects of massage on skin as it ages.

Training – legs further apart during exercise means less likely to fall b/c wider base of support. Want head over base of support

–       Tai Chi and dancing are good for balance – and good low impact activities for people undergoing a flare to present the sweating-to-itching issue

–       Teach people how to get off the floor via balance and motor ability so they can help themselves – mobility is an important factor for skin health too. you can develop a lot of scar tissue (especially if you spend all day scratching the sh*t out of yourself) so setting yourself up for more general body mobility will help your skin. This is also why massage is known to help people with eczema I believe, because you get the blood flow stimulation and help cleanse out irritants/chemicals. Though also I’ve been wondering about the “new” organ that scientists discovered… the interstitium, and where that will come into play with skin health and chronic skin conditions. I’ll do a separate post on the interstitium later on.

–       Challenge self by doing one sided exercises (like one arm pushups, etc) to work core

ROM (range of motion) – need to be able to move joints as far as they are supposed to move that way no compensation in other joints – again mobility. Also with theories like sanomechanics, where when a joint is loaded, the pressure is hydrostatically spread to other joints. The end result is a floating skeleton, or a balance of all the joints allowing for protection from damage. Apparently the concept is novel, but the application of how to achieve it feels a lot like a cross between meditation, yoga/tai chi/other flow types routines, and good postural alignment. But what sanomechanics made me wonder for years, was if we can accept the concept of joints “communicating” (for lack of a better way to describe it), and keeping one another in balance, why isn’t the idea that the skin behaves similarly or in combination with such “communication” not a theory? I’ll work on fleshing out more about what I mean by that later (maybe in the same post I do about interstitium).

–       so need to learn body’s ROM (different for each person)

PSYCHOLOGICAL – effects on nervous system and brain

–       painkillers mimic endorphins (but one can’t OD on self made endorphins)

–       endorphins mask pain (so good for arthritis) – And potentially itching, given some pathways of itching and pain being similar (post coming soon on this too!)

–       moving increase lubrication of joints and produces endorphins but won’t fix arthritis – but creation of endorphins may help also distract from the itchy sensations!

–       exercise wakes up brain (thalamus) – think smarter and faster (cognitive abilities)

o   elderly can think as well as younger kids but as slower rates

o   consistent exercise maintains cognitive speed

o   exercise prevents dementia (or slows it in those already afflicted, b/c more O2 to brain decreases plaque – especially in regular dementia)

The more you exercise, the less likely you will die from anything – exercise is dose related

–       150 minutes physical activity a week for adults at minimum (so 25 minutes 6 days a week, or 5 days minimum) – I’d say this is an important mark to meet in general, especially when you have a skin flare too!

–       more benefits for longer durations of exercise b/c chemical reactions ongoing – I’m curious if that would be the case with eczema flares, or is it more dependent on the activity level (low/high impact, low/high heart rate, perspiration rates, etc)?

–       want to work at intensity hard enough that one can’t have a conversation  – I tend to do body weight/weight lifting rather than pure aerobic type exercises to avoid sweating. though I will take long walks in my hilly neighborhood, which sometimes winds me (though I am 34 weeks pregnant now)

–       want to be a little sore so just exercise until tired – Would being sore help distract from flare symptoms?

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the magic of medicinal ideologies

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Something that has always fascinated me has been the underlying ideologies behind medicine of different regions/cultures, be it modern western science, naturopathic medicine (which can blend a lot of the holistic and western medicine practices), traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, or yoga.

As western medicine is the most familiar, I will talk about that briefly at the end.

The other day I went to a Qi Gong and Tai Chi school where I talked with one of the instructors about the concepts behind medical Qi Gong. We talked a little bit about my skin and the instructor mentioned how the skin and the liver are connected in the Chinese ideology and so if the skin is showing lots of signs of disease, there may be an issue with the liver’s digestion. She also mentioned that I would be a person expected to have an imbalance of yang over yin. Yin and yang are seen as complimentary energies that keep the body in balance, with yin being the cooler, more feminine energy, and yang being a hotter, more masculine one.

In regards to nutrition, when I was seeing an acupuncturist a few years ago, she also talked about the dietary components that might be causing my skin issues. She also believed that I had an imbalance of yin and yang, (in that again I had more yang), hence the inflammation. Her advice to me was to eat less spicy food, avoid sugars, and have more bitter herbs in my diet, as well as continuing the treatments I was getting from her in acupuncture, cupping, and massage.

The National Eczema Associate interviewed Dr. Xiu-Min Li (a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) who studies asthma and allergies (including AD) and went on to explain about traditional Chinese medicine and how it fits into the treatment of eczema. The article provides more insight into how TCM is starting to be incorporating into mainstream western medicine, with the goal of having an alternative to use before topical steroids. It would seem that many people currently turn to try traditional Chinese medicine when standard western medicine practices of topical/oral steroids and other topical medications don’t do the trick.

When I was doing my yoga teacher training a while back they talked about chakras. Chakras are energetic points of the subtle body and there are 7 of them that line the spinal column, and they each are meant to represent a basic level of human consciousness. According to what I learned during the training, when the third chakra (Manipura) is unbalanced, one can expect to see eczema and other stress-related skin conditions. This may be because the third chakra is connected to the detox related organs (like the liver) as well as the abdominals, obliques, etc.

Nutrition based in the Ayurvedic ideology talks about balancing the Pitta dosa (doshas are energies that control how we act, think, move, etc), and to do that they advise avoiding eggs, wheat, milk, nightshades, spicy foods, corn, shellfish, and overly sugary foods. Eczema is seen to be more of an excess of Pitta dosha, or more fire, hence trying to eliminate inflammatory foods.

Here’s an anecdotal story published by the National Eczema Association a while back about a family that turned to Ayurveda when the western medicine wasn’t helping their daughter’s eczema.

In regards to modern western medicine practices, a few comparison points are developing that reflect the more holistic ideals in the ideologies mentioned above. For example, added sugar is more or less nationally seen as being inflammatory, and many doctors will caution against having a diet that includes too much of it. There are also more practices such as taking bleach baths to help reduce infection risk and other treatments that can be done at home without a prescription that a western doctor will recommend now. And the recommendations around lotions and moisturizers (over the counter) are more prevalent, though the brands which are suggested still vary. Light therapy/phototherapy is also recommended to help increase vitamin D exposure, and more and more doctors are also advising getting moving more to help with healing, as well as different solutions to try at night to help with sleep- from stress relieving techniques like meditation or taking a bath at night, to antihistamines.

I personally however, have not yet had a doctor who engaged me in a conversation that got more specifically into nutrition (minus not eating a lot of sugar or junk food). I am not sure if it is out of their scope of practice, but it has not come up in 26 years of seeing doctors, which surprises me. Many doctors, as far as I can tell, still think eczema is not really related to food, but as I do have food allergies I was born with, I would probably be a prime candidate to test for new allergies. The rub there is that generally doctors will prescribe getting a patch test done- but you have to have cleared up skin for the test results to be more or less accurate, and you can’t be on steroids at the time (and I haven’t had clear enough skin in about 3 years).

There is also the holistic medicine movement we see that is not specifically tied to any of the above ideologies. It includes more of western herbalism, often crossed with different nutrition changes and protocols, like the autoimmune protocol, or the elimination diet, or other variations to help with what is called the “leaky gut” syndrome. There are tons of resources from bloggers, nutritionists, doctors, etc about how to go about a nutritional change to heal whatever ailments you are undergoing with food, and I’ve also noticed a lot of sufferers of eczema have gone into nutrition after having success controlling their conditions with their dietary changes (one example being Prime Physique Nutrition). There are also movements to changing the whole lifestyle to be more holistic (like making your own cleaning products as well as skin creams, moisturizers, body wash products. A lot of this new movement is grounded in taking control of your health, often after having tried working with doctors in modern western practices for long periods of time unsuccessfully.

A health resurgence in America has been in herbalism. Some famous members of the community include Rosemary Gladstar (author of Herbal Healing for Women), Susan Weed (author of Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year), Aviva Romm, Mark Blumenthal (founder of the American Botanical Council), Christopher Hobbs, and many, many others. Of note, I am usually deep into researching about women’s health, hence the references above. Gladstar does have a book on men’s health called Herbal Healing for Men.

From Gladstar’s book Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health (which I own) she briefly talks about her general advice as an herbalist for how women can keep balance in the bodies by doing “good living practices”, which she notes as having proper nutrition, ample enough rest, joyful exercise, self connection, and tonic herbs. Delving deeper into nutrition she says to eat foods close to their natural states (which also means eat what grows seasonally), pay attention to how you feel while eating and afterwards, eat organic when you can, and eat  alkalizing foods. She notes about the latter that a lot of the disorders women have thrive in acidic conditions (aka when we eat too many sweets and carbs).

Personally, I have found relief from the most extreme symptoms by modifying my diet (I usually avoid eating wheat products and sugar because I tend to over consume foods containing them), and by using products approved by the NEA that avoid parabens, alcohol, and other chemicals that can be irritants for people with eczema. Acupuncture did seem to help- though I can’t say it was in isolation, since I did get massaged each time (which is also known for helping eczema). I tend to only bathe in a diluted bleach bath when I feel like my skin is getting close to infection (not sure how to explain how I know when that point is), otherwise this winter I did take a lot of baths with either apple cider vinegar (works similarly to bleach) or epsom salt (tends to calm me down and works well for helping me get through the dry out phase of TSW faster). I generally avoid using topical steroids when I can because I have gone through withdrawals before, and because I don’t like the reliance on something that doesn’t fix my issue (usually starting on steroids means I have to stay on them because I flare back up as soon as I start a taper).

All in all it does feel like there are more overlaps occurring over time in these differing ideologies, and we are seeing them sort of blend together in effort to figure out how to deal with chronic non-fatal diseases such as eczema. Whether or not they work still mostly seems to comes down to a person-by-person basis.

 

REFERENCES

“Ayurvedic Medicine and Eczema.” National Eczema Association, https://nationaleczema.org/ayurvedic-medicine-eczema/. Accessed 14 May 2018.

Berzin, Robin. “The Simple Elimination Diet that Could Change Your Life Forever.” Mind Body Green, https://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-12540/the-simple-elimination-diet-that-could-change-your-life-forever.html. Accessed 14 May 2018.

“The Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Eczema.” Pacific College of Oriental Medicine, https://www.pacificcollege.edu/news/blog/2016/08/19/effects-traditional-chinese-medicine-eczema. Accessed 14 May 2018.

Ehrlich, Henry. “Traditional Chinese Medicine and Eczema: An Interview with Xiu-Min Li, M.D.” National Eczema Association, https://nationaleczema.org/traditional-chinese-medicine-and-eczema/. Accessed 14 May 2018.

Gottfried, Sara “Is the Autoimmune Protocol Necessary?” Sara Gottfried MD, https://www.saragottfriedmd.com/is-the-autoimmune-protocol-necessary/. Accessed 14 May 2018.

“The Three Doshas: The Keys to Your Individual Nature.” Eat Taste Heal, http://www.eattasteheal.com/ayurveda101/eth_bodytypes.htm. Accessed 14 May 2018.

“Yoga for Skin Diseases”, Yoga India, http://yoga-india.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Yoga-for-Skin-Diseases-Anna-Mayer.pdf. Accessed 14 May 2018.

 

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my travel wishlist

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As the movement of creating more open dialogue around living with eczema grows, more and more events and opportunities are flourishing to help spread the word too.

My top 5 choices of places/events/conferences/camps/programs I would want to attend include:

  • Eczema Expo: Created by the National Eczema Association, this event brings together patients, caregivers, medical professionals, and product makers all to talk and connect over eczema. They even give you an idea of what the trip is like here. It just seems like a Renaissance Faire for sufferers of eczema and I’d love to go next year (hopefully it’s in Maryland or Massachusetts one year though!).

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  • Camp Wonder: This is an amazing program run by the Children’s Skin Disease Foundation that allows children to experience camp despite their skin conditions. I would love to be a counselor one day!

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  • Avène Hydrotherapy Center: First of all, this center is in the south of France, which is a beautiful land I long to re-visit. The spring supposedly was discovered to have healing properties when a Marquis’ horse was cured of pruritus after a few swims.  In time a hydrotherapy center and dermatological lab were built there, and so far, the testimonials of people getting treated there are beyond promising. Plus, like I said before, south of France. Be still my heart. Note: Avène also has US product lines now.

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  • Hannan-Chuo Hospital – A hospital in Japan thats dermatology department is run by Dr. Sato, who does a lot of research and treating of topical steroid withdrawal. You check in as a patient for a few months, and come out cured apparently. Unfortunately his blog is only in Japanese, but I’ll link it here for you multilingual individuals).
  • The Dead Sea – I hear its mud/water has some amazing healing properties due to its salts. It seems like many companies have turned the mud/water into packable salts for medicinal cosmetic lines, for example making bath soaks and other products, but I would love to be able to go there one day and just roll around for myself in the sea.

Other random events and classes that would pique my interest if I came across them and make me want to up and travel would be:

  • yoga retreats for skin sufferers
  • skin herbal remedy classes
  • book chats by writers with eczema
  • eczema in the arts conventions (I’m thinking like a comic con for skin!)
  • eczema spas (which I liken to Korean spas in my head)