baby and the beast: caretaking with eczema

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So many searches come up with how to be a caretaker for a person or child with eczema, but I haven’t heard from, or found research more about the challenges and options for when the caretaker is the one with eczema.

This week I am watching my baby cousin. He’s about 7 months old now and his mom leaves him with me starting around 7am until anywhere from 6-8pm. It’s my first time watching an infant and though he is a delight, today required some adjustments to my routine as I overslept. Normally, when I have a rough night, I can sleep from 6-8am and catch up on some of the lost time. And then the first  thing I do when I get out of bed is take a warm shower and then apply lotion (as it helps my skin absorb it better when I shower first. Also for those interested, I am currently using Exederm lotion as my go-to).

Today however, I failed to get up before my cousin had to leave so instead I just rolled out of bed and got the baby, dry flaky skin and all. As I haven’t had enough time to zip off to take my usual shower, because I obviously can’t leave him alone for long periods of time (and I am not familiar enough with his nap schedule to know if I have enough time to shower during one), the day has come down to being a lot of a mind over matter deal about my skin. Yes I still itch, and my hands especially are quite dry, but mostly I’ve focused on the mini wheat, and by doing so I have been able to ignore my own normal tweaks and discomforts. There’s actually a fair amount of studies that show that being able to have a distraction helps decrease the itch sensation due to how itching is perceived via the brain (but more on that in a post coming soon about addiction to scratching).

Though I understand the necessity of taking care of oneself physically and mentally, before others (such as with the oxygen masks on airplanes), I do recognize when handling my skin is less than urgent. Yes, I am dry and theoretically could desperately use some more lotion, but I feel well enough that I can handle waiting to do my usual routine until tonight. That being said, after changing his diaper I did have to wash and soap my hands thoroughly which caused some cracking so I did apply lotion then. The rest of my body is holding up well enough in the meantime.

Plus the advantages of babysitting an infant are that they keep you up and moving. I probably feel relatively good because I haven’t stopped moving around with him, adding validity to the “motion is lotion” mantra. Although sweat-inducing physical activity has been seen as eczema-provoking, overall it seems there still hasn’t been enough research done to figure out what kinds of exercise are the best for people suffering from eczema. Research for moderate, non-sweat-inducing activity helping eczema has been fairly supported by organizations like the National Eczema Association, which encourages trying low-intensity activities such as yoga, tai chi, pilates, walking, and gardening. I’d love to take my cousin out for a walk but it’s currently 45F and down pouring so I’ll settle for doing some squats with the extra baby weight. 🙂

I think one of the most important things when you have a flop day in terms of your care of a chronic (non-fatal) disease is to not get too stressed out. As we all say, life happens, and so sometimes it’s best to just roll with the punches and let that bad day pass on by. So long as it doesn’t become a habit of mis-care to yourself, you’ll most likely be okay.

And so, all in all though I look like a ragamuffin and clearly didn’t take proper care of my skin today, I am not upset and I know I’ll survive one less than ideal day.

Are there any other caretakers (parents, guardians, babysitters, senior home workers, etc) who suffer from eczema and have had to forgo their usual skin care every now and then in order to take care of someone else?

 

REFERENCES

Fuller, John. “Eczema and Exercise: The challenge of enjoying exercise without exacerbating your eczema can be a delicate balancing act.” National Eczema Association, https://nationaleczema.org/eczema-exercise/. Accessed 16 Apr 2018.

Kim A, Silverberg JI. A systematic review of vigorous physical activity in eczema. Br J Dermatol. 2016 Mar; 174(3):660-662.

Mochizuki H, Kakigi R. Itch and brain. The Journal of Dermatology. 2015 Aug 5;42(8):761-767.