hot flashes with a side of holidays

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Photo by Toni Cuenca on Pexels.com

Happy belated Halloween! Yes, I know I’m a day late but I’m including other holidays to pad my belated holiday post.

I started writing this at 3am on Halloween, and boy was I feeling it. I’d say I was doing about as well as an old cracking, stiff black leather couch on a dry heat kind of day when hot human flesh sprawls on top it (aka I was both drying out and exuding an uncomfortable amount of heat). To compound that, Fi kept waking up around every 2 hours, and it takes me at least 15-45 minutes to go back to sleep after she’s cared for, so deep healing sleep was not in my repertoire the other night, folks.

And so, instead of sleeping, I got all ready to chat about my once favorite holiday, Halloween. Did I mention how I absolutely love to dress up (or did before my skin started raging against the machine that is my body)? Anyway, I truly believe this day (or days) of year is (are) incredibly magical. For one, there are so many different cultural holidays, from our Halloween roots of Samhain, to All Saints’ Day to Latin America’s Día de los Muertos, to harvest festivals, to Guy Fawkes Day, etc.

Let’s start with the American classic holiday, Halloween. We all know how the holiday is celebrated today, at least in North America (though I’ve got a fun example of how it’s changing in an eczema-friendly direction that I’ll talk about later in the post), so for now let’s skip back a few decades to talk about Halloween’s origins.

Here’s the shortened history. Halloween had its roots from the Celtic festival Samhain, a celebration of the end of summer and the start of the harvest season. Because of the weather changes from summer to winter, it was also believed that this was a time when the worlds of the living and the death overlapped, and spirits could return to earth. To celebrate, the Celtic priests (Druids) made large bonfires where people brought sacrifices from their farm production, and they dressed up in animal skins. When the Roman Empire conquered the Celtic territory, they introduced other festivals that blended into our current holiday lore, such as commemorating the dead and festivals of fruit and trees (one which may have inspired the old tradition of bobbing for apples). The blending of Christianity into the Celtic territories led to holidays like All Souls’ Day, which was like Samhain but people dressed up as angels, devils, and saints, and eventually All Saints Day was moved to November 1st and Samhain (which became All Hallows Eve, and then Halloween) became the night before or October 31st. Halloween in America started out more similarly to the harvest festivals, then formed into an amalgam of folklore, ghost stories, mischief, and asking for treats. Over time it was reformed to try to be more community-based with parties, and with treats being given out to avoid tricks becoming the norm. At some point costumes were encouraged, first as a way to deter roaming spirit from recognizing living people, and then it was more for fun as it was modernized to what we know it as today.

Speaking of modernizing, there’s a new version of Sabrina the Teenaged Witch redone as a Netflix original (called Chilling Adventures of Sabrina) that definitely takes a much darker take on the 90s sitcom. In it, Sabrina is a half-witch, half-mortal who is constantly taking on the patriarchy, which is particularly creative when the patriarchy in question is not always that of humanity. But that’s where I’ll stop just in case anyone is planning on watching it (noting that some of the themes and violence are not appropriate for young children). If I were to try to liken the show’s general theme to that of eczema, I’d say it would be that you should always feel free to fight to create your own space, your own identity, and your own world even when the options seem to be telling you that you have a limited amount of choice. I’d elaborate more but I’m trying not to give away too many thematic spoilers.

And as promised, here’s a fun eczema-friendly movement that’s developed. Called the Teal Pumpkin Project, it’s a movement that is in recognition of the growing amount of life-threatening food allergies. Pioneered by a mom named Becky Basalone from Tennessee in 2012, she painted a pumpkin teal to indicate that she would offer alternatives to candy on Halloween, as her son had anaphylaxis and she wanted to have a way for him to still enjoy the holiday without worry. The Food Allergy Research and Education organization picked up the Teal Pumpkin Project and helped it gain country-wide recognition in 2014, encouraging people around the nation to put out these teal pumpkins to let families know that there are allergy-free (non-edible) treats available. So now, for those children out there that may be going through some sort of systematic inflammation disorder (be it food allergies, eczema, or something else), they also have a way to still partake in the festivities of All Hallow’s Eve. If you want to be involved, you can paint a pumpkin teal and put it outside your house, and then add your house to the teal pumpkin project map.

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Now for Día de los Muertos (or Day of the Dead). This holiday has seen an increase in recognition in the states over the years (just look at movies such as Book of Life, or the newer Disney movie Coco). It entails a celebration of one’s deceased, honoring their lives by creating an ofrenda (or offerings) for them of food, flowers, colorful skeletons, and people don brightly colored clothing and have parades and music and festivities to celebrate their family. The belief (of which developed from a mix of Aztec culture and Catholicism) is that on the Day of the Dead one’s ancestors come back to visit on earth, but it is disrespectful to grieve for one’s deceased, so instead it is a day of reunion and remembrance and happiness.

And lastly we have Guy Fawkes Day. Many of you may be familiar with this holiday due to the 2006 movie V for Vendetta, that centers around this elusive date of November 5th (easily remembered by the ditty: “remember remember the 5th of November, the gunpowder treason and plot. I know of no reason why the gunpowder treason should ever be forgot.” The history behind this holiday was that under various monarchs in England, (but primarily under King James I’s rule), Catholics were persecuted, unable to marry, fined for refusing to attend non-Catholic services, etc. Various attempts to overthrow the ruling king were enacted but the most famous was that done by Guy Fawkes and company. Their plan was to use gunpowder to blow up parliament on November 5th, 1605. Somehow, a letter was delivered to parliament about the plot, and Fawkes was stopped November 4, and subsequently he and his team were sentenced to be drawn and quartered as punishment for high treason. Celebrations with bonfires started after the plot was revealed and November 5th became known as Guy Fawkes Day, (even spreading to America as Pope Day where people burned the Pope in effigy). Although America stopped celebrating their version, in Britain, Guy Fawkes Day entails (even today) bonfires, fireworks, parades, and of course, burning Fawkes in effigy. The holiday has taken a spin where Guy Fawkes is sometimes seen as a hero, a change which is attributed to the movie V for Vendetta, where V wears a Guy Fawkes mask as he attempts to topple a fascist government regime. Spoiler alert: in the movie, V goes on a last stand rampage to kill off the remaining “bad guys” and results in him sacrificing himself. While he is dying, he shares a “kiss” (put in quotes because the heroine, Evie, kisses his mask), and then he dies and she puts his body onto the train with all the explosives, that runs under parliament. Maybe if V had lived in this time period, instead of deciding to sacrifice himself he would have jumped into the bandwagon of #unhideECZEMA, but pioneered his own movement to be about unhiding burns, and then he could have removed the mask and gloves and found himself worthy of living a new life with Evie. But then there wouldn’t be a movie.

Speaking of movies, here’s a side note to end with (though it’s not family-friendly and it’s quite violent and whatnot): the movie Deadpool actually supports the idea really well of skin issues not being a big deal. Spoiler alert: Ryan Reynolds’ character Wade, aka Deadpool, becomes horribly disfigured from a mutant experiment and spends the first movie chasing after the psychopath doctor who did it to him to get the doctor to make him good-looking again before he is wiling to go back to see his beloved girlfriend/fiancée, Ness. When that plan ultimately fails and he is going to be forever scarred, he is still reunited with Ness and she is upset at him for wasting time away from her, but unfazed by his skin. The old adage holds true, love is goes deeper than skin deep.

And now here’s to me hoping my skin is cooler tonight and I can sleep.

 

REFERENCES

Born, Courtney. “Origin of the Teal Pumpkin Project- Interview with FACET’s Becky Basalone.” Living Allergic, https://www.allergicliving.com/2014/10/23/the-origin-of-the-teal-pumpkin-project-interview-with-becky-basalone-facet/. Accessed 30 Oct 2018.

Greenspan, Jesse. “Guy Fawkes Day: A Brief History.” History, https://www.history.com/news/guy-fawkes-day-a-brief-history. Accessed 30 Oct 2018.

“Halloween 2018.” History. https://www.history.com/topics/halloween/history-of-halloween. Accessed 30 Oct 2018.

Richman-Abdou, Kelly. “Día de los Muertos: How Mexico Celebrates Its Annual ‘Day of the Dead’.” My Modern Met, https://mymodernmet.com/dia-de-los-muertos-day-of-the-dead/. Accessed 1 Nov 2018.

review: prime physique nutrition’s conquerer eczema academy

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

I have been following Abby Lai, a registered holistic nutritionist, and the creator of Prime Physique Nutrition for a few years now. I remember first coming across her blog and being flabbergast that there were others who had this annoying condition to similar severities as myself; it made me feel less alone. She also is the creator of the first eczema podcasts.

Since then, her and Jen, the blogger behind Eczema Holistic Healing, have created the Conquerer Eczema Academy, which is an 8-week program they do that offers a wealth of options to the sufferers of eczema.

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For those new to the whole eczema issue, they have lots of information about what causes it, common treatments and ways to manage flares, how diet can impact your skin and flares, coping mechanisms, etc in the form of videos. The program includes a private Facebook group so the participants can find community with one another and get questions answered by Abby and Jen. There are weekly group video sessions where everyone can get online and feel the immediate impact of being part of a group and supported, as well as discuss various topics together.

All in all it’s a useful program. As Abby says, you get out of it what you put into it. She also says that the participants who have had the most success are the ones that attend the weekly video sessions.

I have to admit I’ve missed a few since the baby came (they are at 8:30pm for my time zone) but I think they are fine. I tend to not have the ability to sit still through a video chat, which is a personal problem, so I tend to prefer posting on the Facebook group more.

Overall I think it’s a useful program, especially if you are someone who feels you don’t have support or that no one understands what you are going through. The program has people who are at all stages of either TSW or eczema flares and so it is comforting to be able to talk through things with others, and compare where we are while rooting for one another.

Abby also offers individual coaching, though I didn’t try it so I’ve got no info about it.

If you’re interested, the link to the program is here.

eczema representation

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Though eczema isn’t the most glamorous of conditions, there is a growing body of representation of people with eczema in various social mediums, which is amazing because the more people that talk about our lives with eczema, the more information, studies, and community are built around it. As I come across more examples, I’ll update this post with the caption NEW.

 

TV SHOWS/MOVIES/DOCUMENTARIES/THEATER

  • One of the most notable now is Peter Moffat’s HBO series, The Night Of, which features the character John Stone, who suffers from aggressive eczema on his feet. Throughout the show we see him try various techniques to manage his eczema including bleach baths, Chinese medicines, airing his feet out, slathering Crisco and wrapping his feet in plastic wrap, UV light, etc.

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  • (NEW) There is also a theater production called ECZEMA! created by Maria Fusco that embodies eczema in a creative way through writing, plays, music (including a musical backtrack of the sounds of Fusco scratching). There’s an interesting article written about it here.
  • (NEW) Briana Banos, a former performer and aerialist has created a documentary called Preventable: Protecting Our Largest Organ, to educate the medical field all about the horror of life with topical steroid withdrawal, and why topical steroids shouldn’t be so freely prescribed.

 

BOOKS

There are also a handful of personal storytelling books about people’s own experiences with eczema, with the authors all having very diverse backgrounds. For example:

And we’re also seeing a growing movement of children’s books about eczema such as:

  • Camille’s Itchy Twitchy Eczema by Candis Butler
  • I Have Eczema by Jen Greatsinger
  • Emmy’s Eczema (Dinosaur Friends) by Jack Hughes

 

COMICS

These prove a lot harder to find (which is unfortunate because I love webcomics!) but here are the two I stumbled across by Ms. Yoshimi Numajiri, (found on Tommy’s Skin of Rose blog).

 

ECZEMA ENTREPRENEURS

You also see a lot of entrepreneurs, whether they are doing eczema coaching of some sort, or have created a specific product/ product line. A few include:

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INSTAGRAM

Naturally instagram has become an amazing platform for expression. There you can find awesome people including most of the entrepreneurs mentioned above.:

 

YOUTUBERS

Of course with youtube we have vloggers too- some that focus all on eczema and others that talk about eczema and its effects around the other aspects of their lives.

  • Zainab Danjuma
  • Brookie Beauty
  • Josh Wright – a pianist and piano teacher that made a video talking about his experience with eczema and TSW and what he used/did to get through it. He also made a post about it here.
  • Dr. Nina Ellis-Hervey – she gives advice about her general body care routines, and this particular video shows how she manages her eczema. She also includes how to make a homemade body butter.

 

BLOGGERS

And of course, there are tons of blogs out there made by dedicated individuals who are spreading the word about what living with eczema is like:

 

MODELING

More and more people are also trying to spearhead showcasing diverse bodies, especially in modeling.

  • Missguided – though not eczema-specific, a new part of their #KeepOnBeingYou movement has models showing off their bodies regards of having “imperfect” skin with the #inyourownskin campaign.
  • (NEW) Dove DermaSeries – creating a movement to help women “make peace with dry skin”, Dove specifically selected to have models with all sorts of skin conditions to show better representation of skin conditions and subsequently to help women feel comfortable in their skins

 

So if you are out there feeling like you suffer from a condition that no one gets, or that isn’t really seen in the media, don’t feel alone! There are lots of us out here each expressing ourselves and living with this condition in our own ways, just waiting for you to find us. And many of us are open to people reaching out as well. 🙂