alternative/holistic medicine, eczema, media/arts, travel/traveling, women's health

girl power! on collectives and community (and witches!)

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Eczema is a devilish disease that is best thwarted mentally (in my case) by keeping myself busy reading, researching, and daydreaming. The strongest distraction as of late has been collectives. I have always had an affinity for all sorts of collectives because I think that when the project comes together from all that cooperation, it showcases the greatness of an amalgam of multiple minds. As such I have become more aware of collective collaborations over the years, especially when it comes to the arts. As I am often entangled in women’s health, below are a few of the more recent finds that are all women/all girl collective efforts.

The Secret Love of Geek Girls is an anthology created by Hope Nicholson and other artists, of prose and comic forms, which encompasses various topics such as divorce, coming out, asexuality, young love, and other aspects all from the lenses of women who identify and/or embody the idea of a geek. I absolutely loved it. It’s an anthology I have purchased to randomly flip open pages to read when I’m feeling a certain kind of way. Also I think it would be an awesome idea to create an eczema anthology one day, to share the experiences and feelings and worlds of those afflicted.

Girls Drawin’ Girls Tarot Deck  is a beautiful tarot deck done by the Girls Drawin’ Girls, a group formed by Melody Simpsons (who worked on the Simpsons). The group was formed to allow women a space to compete in a traditionally male-dominated industry. Speaking of tarot, I’ve gotten very interested in it lately. Not only does it gave a strong history of feminine mysticism but some people in the medical and health professional fields have been starting to use it as a therapeutic device. Jessica Dore uses tarot in her clinical work as she becomes a social worker, and Dr. Art Rosengarten, a clinical therapist, uses tarot for psychotherapy. There are a few older studies (like this one from the 90s) about tarot used for therapy, and the general impression I got is that due to the symbolism, tarot helps to give the clients a more visual way to process out their thoughts and bring forth aspects that are on their subconscious. In my head, if nothing else I see it as being a therapeutic tool, much like the Rorschach (ink blot) test but more multifaceted, and I would love to see more studies done on it. I personally want to learn how to do tarot readings for the storytelling aspect, but if it makes me subsequently be more in the moment, reflexive, or mindful (or if nothing else, distracted from my itches), I’m not complaining.

And since we’ve delved into tarot, and are thus already over the line and into mysticism, we must then talk about witches. The history of witches in America (as I understand it to be from listening to the tours in Salem and from this Smithsonian article), is mostly a tale of fear mongering. It started in Salem, Massachusetts (at the time the town of Danvers was also a part of Salem). A young girl and her cousin (Elizabeth and Abigail), whose slave (Tituba) used to tell them stories to amuse her and her friends, supposedly faked going into a possessed fits, their friends followed, and then religious men got involved who started calling out all witches to be persecuted (usually with the sentence of being jailed forever). A witch ended up encompassing any wayward woman (or sometimes man), such as one who didn’t behave as expected, who was promiscuous, who spoke her mind with the candor of a man,  who dabbled in the art of herbal healing, etc, and evidence for arrest included visions for a time. The tension was ramped up because of various families in towns competing for resources and believing the high tensions to be the result of devilry (witches were thought to commune with the devil). I’ve heard it thought that there may have also been competition for tourism and so slandering the other parts of Salem (e.g. Salem Village versus Salem Town) with the threat of witchcraft was a surefire way to insure more money into your own town (but I’m not sure this is true- I just heard it by word of mouth). The culmination of events led to the infamous Salem Witch Trials, with 200 accused, and the death of 20 people (not including those who died in jail).

Today there is more of a new era of witch culture in America. Well there are two blurred and overlapping lines of “witches”. There are the herbalists and healers who had had a bad rap in the past for practicing medicine and healing outside of the realm of religion/formal hospital training, and then there are the new age witches (which can also include herbalists and healers). As I live very close to Salem today and Vermont/Maine, I do get glimpses of both, but only limitedly. A lot of Salem is rampant tourism like the Harry Potter store Wynott’s Wands (though their wares are beautiful and I found out that their wands sell well as batons for conductors, which is really cool).

One example of the new age of witches is HausWitch, the store creation of Erica Feldmann who describes it as “a modern metaphysical lifestyle brand and shop” where they sell “witchy” wares made by independent makers, including a lot of self care body products, journals, courses (like tarot readings and seasonally-focused events), etc. The most interesting aspect of HausWitch and stores like it are the modernization of witchcraft as an inclusive movement. HausWitch for example, works to create community and thus holds many different events and healing practices and activism discussion among other activities to foster connections. Traditionally, a bunch of witches together in a group was called a coven, and was seen and portrayed as a dangerously bad thing, but in seeing covens today, they are essentially just another form of community with the commonality, instead of being location, sparking the starting connection.

Personally, as a person who is always trying to find ways to foster community wherever I go, I think the whole new resurgence of witchcraft is pretty cool, and I’m excited to learn more about it and see where else in the country it’s happening. I am particularly biased because I have always loved herbalism and since my eczema has gotten crazy, self care, and so any movements that entails taking care of yourself and immersing yourself in a community that is seasonally-inclined, is my cup of tea.

 

REFERENCES

Blumberg, Jess. “A Brief History of the Salem Witch Trials: One town’s strange journey from paranoia to pardon.” Smithsonian.com, https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/a-brief-history-of-the-salem-witch-trials-175162489/. Accessed 17 Sept 2018.

Dore, Jessica. “Tarot + Psychology: An Interview with Dr. Art Rosengarten.” Jessica Dore, https://www.jessicadore.com/tarot-psychology-interview-dr-art-rosengarten/. Accessed 17 Sept 2018.

Heaney, Katie. “Does Your Therapy Need More Tarot?” The Cut, https://www.thecut.com/2018/07/does-your-therapy-need-more-tarot.html. Accessed 17 Sept 2018.

Semetsky, Inna. Integrating Tarot readings into counselling and psychology. Spirtuality and Health International. 2005;6(2).

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).

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