alternative/holistic medicine, books, career, eczema, flare-up, my journey, skin care, sugar, topical steroid withdrawal, wounds and infections

“and now for something completely different”

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Photo by Jens Johnsson on Pexels.com

Remember how I did a post yesterday about my skin care regime? Yeah ignore that. Much like how lives change, the way I take care of my skin is almost as fluid as my skin itself. Let me explain.

Yesterday I was talking about how I was using two products (Eczema Honey Co.’s Nut-Free Natural Healing Cream and Chuckling Goat’s Calm Down Kefir Lotion), and talked a little about them both. Well last night, Fi was fighting the sleep hard and I couldn’t get her down until around 11pm (after trying for 3 hours!), which meant that I didn’t get to catch up on the massive sleep deprivation from the night before. While I was trying to get her to calm down and sleep through various means, I was using the Chuckling Goat lotion on some dry areas (hands, feet, knees) to help work through some light itching. Finally, the little piglet stayed asleep when I put her down and I thankfully succumbed to my own exhaustion, only to be woken up around midnight by myself scratching the sh*t out of my hands, arms, and feet. It was so bad I could feel my skin starting to weep. Here’s a picture of the aftermath on my hand:

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When I woke up enough to realize what I was doing, I took some Benadryl and waited for it to kick in and knock me out. But then I had to wake up at around 3am because Fi has been big into not sleeping through more than 4 hours at a time lately, which was rough (I don’t know if you’ve ever tried to cut your sleep short when taking Benadryl, but it is hard to mentally function afterwards).

Today I started the day off (once the Fi routine was completed) with another bleach bath to help level out my skin, followed by rinsing off using the Chuckling Goat Calm Down soap bar, and then using the Eczema Honey Co cream again. I am still very much enjoying it, in fact, it’s time for a mini review!

Eczema Honey Co is a company where the founders live with eczema themselves (always a plus because you know they are actually experiencing the condition they are treating). They currently have 4 products: their original cream, their nut-free (no almond oil) version, an oatmeal scrub, and cotton gloves, and the cool thing about their line is that they have a monthly subscription, which is lovely because when you have eczema all over your body, you know that you’ll need a lot of product. The one I am using is there nut-free cream and so far I love it. It’s only got a few ingredients (Organic Pure Honey, Grapeseed Oil, Organic Grated Beeswax, Organic Sunflower Oil, Colloidal Oatmeal, Pure Spring Water, and Optiphen), which makes it easier to understand what I’m putting on my body (aka looking up the studies on how specific ingredients affect skin). This is an important factor to consider because our skin is quite absorbent and things we put on it can end up in our hypodermis and/or our blood stream (and this is even more true for people with compromised skin like those of us with eczema). Of note: optiphen is a chemical made of Phenoxyethanol, Caprylyl Glycol, and Sorbic Acid, and the biggest concern with it seems to be that it can be a skin irritant according to EWG Skin Deep Cosmetics Database. My opinion on the product overall is that it seems to be the best thing I have tried up to now. I put it on after baths or showers and it tends to hold in the moisture best like I mentioned in my post yesterday, and it smells nice and seems to be helping reduce the major TSW signs: the redness, the dryness, etc. Jury’s still out as to whether it is helping with the itch (currently it seems my itching is worst 11pm-4am and nothing can fix that minus taking Benadryl to knock me out). All in all I think for now, especially given that I have only used it for a few days now, this is the product I am going to stick with and see where it takes me and my skin. The only less than positive comment I have is that it is a bit sticky, but it’s mostly made of honey, so that’s expected. All in all I’m giving it two thumbs up so far.

Now why do I think I am enjoying this Eczema Honey Co product? It may jusr be because their first ingredient is honey, and honey historically has been used topically to treat wounds. The evidence is still a bit iffy on how effective honey really is on wounds other than partial thickness burns, with some studies toting the antibacterial properties when used for wounds (studied on the wound of a stumptail macaque), and other saying that honey can slow healing (of venous ulcers in particular). But all in all, as with most things, I think it comes down to using what you feel is comfortable (and consulting an open-minded medical professional who you can discuss your concerns and questions) to determine what you want to use for your care.

Speaking of skin (which I almost always am), I am currently reading The Little Book of Skin Care: Korean Beauty Secrets for Healthy, Glowing Skin by Charlotte Cho. So far I’m enjoying it immensely, as it goes into detail about how the Korean skincare regiment works in a nutshell, as well as how the mentality of it differs (Cho says that Koreans enjoy their skin care and don’t think of it as a chore). I am trying to think about how those of us living with eczema/TSW could learn to love our skincare regimes. It feels like such a foreign concept, but I can see how it would be an immensely helpful part of healing. So, I am thinking about how to apply what I’m reading in the book to myself and if it works, subsequently to the eczema/TSW community. Keep your eyes posted for that in a bit!

I also wondered if there are estheticians that specialize in eczema/TSW, because that would be awesome. Another idea I had was that if in some world I could learn Korean, it would be awesome to go to South Korea (with my sister who has been studying Korean for years) and experience their skin care ways for myself. But that’s a pipe dream.

On a complete and utter tangent, all I dream about lately is eating That’s It Bites, the blueberry ones in particular. But actually. I go to sleep wanting them, I wake up wanting them, and then when I am sitting around during the day, especially if I get a little bit hungry, I crave them so badly. I think I’ve latched onto them because:

  1. That’s It bars are so good
  2. blueberries are some of my favorite berries
  3. the chocolate truffle version is delicious, particularly the blueberry one
  4. they don’t have any other ingredients in them besides blueberries, apples, and dark chocolate (cocoa, cane sugar  and cocoa butter), and I’m not eating sweets with ingredients I can’t track

So basically if you are ever feeling like you want to send me something nice… send me those – insert winking face here – !

Anyway, in regards to the title of today’s post, what I meant by taking a new direction is that I am trying to figure out what my focus, both hobby and career-wise, will be. I am accepting that my skin is going to be the limiting factor for a while to come and in that interim I am trying to figure out what I can do, not just in the meantime, but potentially forever. I want to be able to start to commit to things again and know that I’ll still be able to do them even with the worst of flares. I know I’ve dabbled with writing for a while, but now I am thinking of taking it seriously (Glob help me!). If you know of any opportunities, let me know (this is my desperate reach out to the universe)!

Tangential parting thoughts: Did anyome know the reference I made with the post’s title? I credit my dad for why things like that are still stuck in my head today.

 

REFERENCES

Jull AB, Cullum N, Dumville JC, Westby MJ, Deshpande S, Walker N. Honey as a topical treatment for acute and chronic wounds. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. 2015 Mar 6;(3):CD005083.

Jull AM, Walker N, Deshpande S. Honey as a topical treatment for wounds. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Feb 28;(2):CD005083.

“Optiphen.” EWS Skin Deep Cosmetics Database, https://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/732140/OPTIPHEN/. Accessed 17 Oct 2018.

Staunton CJ, Halliday LC, Garcia KD. The use of honey as a topical dressing to treat a large, devitalized wound in a stumptail macaque (Macaca arctoides). Contemp Top Lab Anim Sci. 2005 Jul;44(4):43-45.

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).

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eczema, my journey, skin biome, skin care

there are germs on my skin! part 2

selective focus photography of person wearing three bangles
Photo by Godisable Jacob on Pexels.com

It’s my favorite time of year and I just received my Chuckling Goat package (but more on that in a bit).

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A few months back I wrote a post about the skin biome and how I was excited by the small movement of companies creating products geared towards helping it. Since then there have been developments about different companies creating products to help either work with the natural skin biome or to help reintroduce micro-diversity to create an appropriate balance for healthy skin.

I didn’t know it previously, but Johnson and Johnson had a movement a while back to create products that didn’t mess up the skin microbiome of babies’ skin. Such products, like Aveeno Eczema Therapy Moisturizing Cream have a trial indicating that they actually help to increase the microbiome diversity of the skin with use over time.

The company has become skin microbiome-focused in a multitude of ways, including offering use of their JLINX incubator under the JLABS. S-Biomedic has joined JLINX and is working to create products that remove the bad bacteria and replace it with good ones to balance out the diversity of the skin back to a healthy level. This idea of balance is becoming more and more accepted as it is found that overuse of antibiotics is causing more harm than good for conditions like eczema. Studies are showing that balanced diversity is what we need for our skin biome, rather than sterility (noting that antibiotics still have their place, including when surgery or infection is involved). Microbiome transplants are now no longer a thing of the future but are instead potentially the next big medical treatment protocol!

More recently, I read a book called The Good Skin Solution by Shann Nix Jones, that talked about the gut and skin microbiome and Jones’ personal experience as to how she came to develop a treatment to help manage her young son’s eczema. The goal was to help increase the diversity of both microbiome using the probiotics in kefir made from their goats’ milk. When it was a success with their son, her and her husband decided to sell their products and hence the Chuckling Goat business was born.

Jones reintroduced me the theory that you need to fix your gut microbiome to have any really lasting effect on your skin, but she added the idea that it’s best to treat both at the same time, (hence her her program that includes probiotics for both the skin and the gut). Needless to say I was intrigued so I looked into her products and went on to order some (but unfortunately I can’t get the kefir drinks because I live in the states and they don’t ship that outside of the UK).

Today the soaps and lotions arrived and I am beyond excited to receive them (happy as a clam… or a ceramic jack-o-lantern!). See my spoils below:

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I’ll have to figure out what to do to increase my gut flora diversity in lieu of kefir, as I was advised to avoid dairy while breastfeeding to see if that helped with Fi’s digestive woes. I’m not sure if goat milk would be okay since it is supposed to have less allergenic components than milk. I may just wait until Fi is done breastfeeding.

 

REFERENCES

Capone K, Klein SL, Kirchner F, Tierney N. “Effects of Topical Lotions on the Atopic Dermatitis Skin Microbiome and Associations with Itch and Skin Barrier Function.” 76th Annual Society for Investigatiev Dermatology (SID) Meeting, Portland, OR. 26-29 Apr, 2017. Poster presentation.

Myles IA, Earland, NJ, Anderson ED, Moore IN, Kieh MD, Williams KW, Saleem A, Fontecilla NM, Welch PA, Darnell DA, Barnhart LA, Sun AA, Uzel G, Datta SK. First-in-human topical microbiome transplantation with Roseomonas mucosa for atopic dermatitis. JCI Insight. 2018 May 3;3(9):e120608.

Parikh-Das A, Ganopolsky I, Nunez C, Moreira L. A clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a OTC colloidal oatmeal skin protectant cream in the management of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in infants and toddlers. JAAD. 2017 Jun 76(6);AB10.

Puniewska, Madgalena. “How the Microbiome Could Transform Your Skin in Surprising Ways.” Johnson&Johnson Innovation, 12 Oct. 2017, https://www.jnj.com/innovation/how-the-microbiome-could-transform-your-skin-in-surprising-ways.

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).