all posts, eczema

moisturizer withdrawal for eczema

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Moisturizer withdrawal (MW) is a hotly controversial topic in the field of eczema (especially in regards to topical steroid withdrawal). The medical community generally is anti-MW, while there are some specific doctors and communities that are very much for it.

Some of the pros I’ve read about on giving up moisturizer include:

  • moisturizers seal in heat, which makes going through eczema/topical steroid withdrawal more uncomfortable
  • your skin produces cortisol naturally, but adding moisturizer can suppress this production (more on that in a bit)
  • you are losing so much skin (more in reference to TSW) that you don’t want to try to lubricate the dead skin and slow your body’s attempt to rid itself of the old tissue
  • most moisturizers have something in them (usually to help them be more shelf stable) that does not help the natural skin biome. As such, they may hinder healing because more resilient skin bacteria, ones that can survive the pH and chemical changes created by said moisturizers, are usually not the benign ones

I then proceeded to go down a rabbit hole in studies trying to understand more about the skin and its own ability to create cortisol (again this was more in reference to trying to understand how to overcome TSW more easily/quickly). The rabbit hole led me to read about keratinocytes and how our skin reacts to stressors.

Keratinocytes (a type of outer skin cell) can create cortisol in response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), as studied in cultured keratinocytes (meaning keratinocytes on petri dishes or other lab-made mediums) and in human skin samples. Keratinocytes also make glucocorticoids (GCs) which are known to block wound healing, but also block pro-inflammatory cytokines (something we know run rampant in those going through topical steroid withdrawal). So, it’s my thinking that the GCs could help as a balancing factor with the excessive inflammation that comes with eczema and TSW. The amount of cortisol produced also changes in response to things like trauma and UV light and dryness. It was the dryness that intrigued me because with conditions like topical steroid withdrawal, we are taught to combat it by applying more moisturizers to prevent dryness, but what if that is decreased the skin’s ability to hit a homeostatic level and kick up its cortisol production?

In Japan, there is a doctor (Dr. Kenji Sato) known for his treatment of eczema and topical steroid withdrawal, and he works in a hospital (Hannan Chuo Hospital) on a program where people enter specifically for TSW and then they stay for an average of 40 days or so and then leave, supposedly healed. Note, they are healed from TSW, but they can still have eczema flares, though those usually aren’t as bad. I’ve been curious about his treatments for a while, especially because the regime doesn’t require strict diets, and the main things it requires are keeping your nails really short, exercising everyday, and not using any moisturizers (no soap, no lotions or creams or ointments, and any showers must be shorter than 1 minute). For those interested in the hospital, there were two comics I came across a while back that tell stories of what it was like to be a patient at this hospital. The first is done on the artist’s personal experience, and the second was created after an interview with a fellow patient.

Personally, I am starting to think moisturizer withdrawal may be the way to go (for myself). I’ve noticed that I itch horribly after baths and sometimes showers, and itch even worse when I put on my lotion or creams on wet skin (which is usually the recommendation of the medical community to help seal in the moisture). To be fair, I do tend to take baths/showers that are too hot by those same medical recommendations, but water tends to cause me pain at any level of exposure so I think I enjoy hot water because it’s a different pain sensation so it blocks out the burning of open wounds.

After thinking about it, as it is currently winter in Massachusetts, this would be a terrible time to go through moisturizer withdrawal. My skin tends to fissure something horribly when it’s dry and especially in winter/when indoors with the heat on. I will think about going through MW in the spring/summer and post about a 40 day trial then.

 

REFERENCES

Cirillo N, Prime SS. Keratinocytes synthesize and activate cortisol. J Cell Biochem. 20011 Jun; 112(6): 1499-1505.

Zhu G, Janjetovic Z, Slominski A. On the role of environmental humidity on cortisol production by epidermal keratinocytes. Exp Dermal. 2014 Jan; 23 (1): 15-17.

Vukelic S, Stojadinovic O, Pastar I, Rabach M, Krzyzanowska A, Lebrun E, Davis SC, Resnik S, Brem H, Tomic-Canic M. Cortisol Synthesis in Epidermis is Induced by IL-1 and Tissue Injury. J Biol Chem. 2011 Mar 25; 286(12): 10265-10275.

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