eczema, my journey, skin biome, skin care

there are germs on my skin! part 2

selective focus photography of person wearing three bangles
Photo by Godisable Jacob on Pexels.com

It’s my favorite time of year and I just received my Chuckling Goat package (but more on that in a bit).

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A few months back I wrote a post about the skin biome and how I was excited by the small movement of companies creating products geared towards helping it. Since then there have been developments about different companies creating products to help either work with the natural skin biome or to help reintroduce micro-diversity to create an appropriate balance for healthy skin.

I didn’t know it previously, but Johnson and Johnson had a movement a while back to create products that didn’t mess up the skin microbiome of babies’ skin. Such products, like Aveeno Eczema Therapy Moisturizing Cream have a trial indicating that they actually help to increase the microbiome diversity of the skin with use over time.

The company has become skin microbiome-focused in a multitude of ways, including offering use of their JLINX incubator under the JLABS. S-Biomedic has joined JLINX and is working to create products that remove the bad bacteria and replace it with good ones to balance out the diversity of the skin back to a healthy level. This idea of balance is becoming more and more accepted as it is found that overuse of antibiotics is causing more harm than good for conditions like eczema. Studies are showing that balanced diversity is what we need for our skin biome, rather than sterility (noting that antibiotics still have their place, including when surgery or infection is involved). Microbiome transplants are now no longer a thing of the future but are instead potentially the next big medical treatment protocol!

More recently, I read a book called The Good Skin Solution by Shann Nix Jones, that talked about the gut and skin microbiome and Jones’ personal experience as to how she came to develop a treatment to help manage her young son’s eczema. The goal was to help increase the diversity of both microbiome using the probiotics in kefir made from their goats’ milk. When it was a success with their son, her and her husband decided to sell their products and hence the Chuckling Goat business was born.

Jones reintroduced me the theory that you need to fix your gut microbiome to have any really lasting effect on your skin, but she added the idea that it’s best to treat both at the same time, (hence her her program that includes probiotics for both the skin and the gut). Needless to say I was intrigued so I looked into her products and went on to order some (but unfortunately I can’t get the kefir drinks because I live in the states and they don’t ship that outside of the UK).

Today the soaps and lotions arrived and I am beyond excited to receive them (happy as a clam… or a ceramic jack-o-lantern!). See my spoils below:

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I’ll have to figure out what to do to increase my gut flora diversity in lieu of kefir, as I was advised to avoid dairy while breastfeeding to see if that helped with Fi’s digestive woes. I’m not sure if goat milk would be okay since it is supposed to have less allergenic components than milk. I may just wait until Fi is done breastfeeding.

 

REFERENCES

Capone K, Klein SL, Kirchner F, Tierney N. “Effects of Topical Lotions on the Atopic Dermatitis Skin Microbiome and Associations with Itch and Skin Barrier Function.” 76th Annual Society for Investigatiev Dermatology (SID) Meeting, Portland, OR. 26-29 Apr, 2017. Poster presentation.

Myles IA, Earland, NJ, Anderson ED, Moore IN, Kieh MD, Williams KW, Saleem A, Fontecilla NM, Welch PA, Darnell DA, Barnhart LA, Sun AA, Uzel G, Datta SK. First-in-human topical microbiome transplantation with Roseomonas mucosa for atopic dermatitis. JCI Insight. 2018 May 3;3(9):e120608.

Parikh-Das A, Ganopolsky I, Nunez C, Moreira L. A clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of a OTC colloidal oatmeal skin protectant cream in the management of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in infants and toddlers. JAAD. 2017 Jun 76(6);AB10.

Puniewska, Madgalena. “How the Microbiome Could Transform Your Skin in Surprising Ways.” Johnson&Johnson Innovation, 12 Oct. 2017, https://www.jnj.com/innovation/how-the-microbiome-could-transform-your-skin-in-surprising-ways.

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).

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eczema, my journey, pregnancy, skin biome, skin care, women's health, wounds and infections

using boob milk for more than the baby

agriculture animal blue sky breakfast
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

As some of you may know I am currently nursing my 3 month old baby girl, and in doing so as she is my first, I’ve learned that leaking is a thing (sometimes it occurs when she’s nursing on one side- the other side will start to drip milk, and other times they seem to leak for no apparently reason at all). As I wear nursing pads in my shirts during the day, the problem begins at night when I’m in bed trying to sleep. The leakage then can be really annoying. So my most recent solution has been spreading the milk on my skin, because why not- it’s already leaking all over it anyway.

My less impulsive logic for trying this experiment came from some research I had been doing a few weeks ago about breastmilk and its health benefits for the baby. Fi got sick and I wanted to know how her immature immune system could handle sickness when she only intakes breastmilk as her food source. This search led me to an internet viral photo showing how a mom’s breast milk changed when her infant got sick. The 2013 study mentioned in that post talks about breast milk’s immunological function and explains how when the mom or baby get sick, the number of leukocytes (aka white blood cells) in the breast milk drastically increases to help protect them, because leukocytes help fight disease (which I found to be such a cool example of symbiosis. I personally have also noticed that breastfeeding seems to keep both me and the baby from getting too severe of sicknesses. In fact, my mom, mother-in-law, and husband each got sick after the baby was born yet Fi and I were fine!).

I also read an article by NPR addressing the breastfeeding versus formula debate for poor countries.  A point it stated made me more curious about breast milk; it said formula can cause increased risks of diarrhea and respiratory infections. I assumed this is so because it requires using water to make (and clean sources are not always available in impoverished countries) but maybe it’s also because formula doesn’t have the same chemical and bacterial composition to allow it to be readily accepted by the baby’s developing digestive and immune systems? By extension I supposed that breast milk had to have some component in it that generally allows it to not irritate the digestive and immune systems*… which is my big sign to think “MICROBIOME” (* this of course is excluding when the baby has allergies or sensitivities to something the mom is eating that is going into her breast milk). The article also talked about how it’s weird that we are constantly trying to research the benefits of breastfeeding when it’s as natural as “breathing, chewing, hearing, passing stool”. But we live in a society where we need evidence and so I decided to play the game of informal (and badly controlled) science to see if I could test my own theory, that breast milk may help with (eczema) healing.

I did not participate in the rigors of the scientific process because I am lazy and I doubt Fi would be content amusing herself long enough for me to do it, but instead I just dabbed some breast milk on my shallow cuts every now and then instead of using neosporin or leaving the cut alone. My observations: it would seem as though breast milk can help with reducing the pain of shallow cuts (I tried it on the cracks on my knuckles and outer ears, cuts on my ankles and hands), and helps to speed up the healing of said cuts. It does not moisturize (the spots I put it on tended to be drier the next day… though that could be because when cuts heal on me, they start skin flaking…) but overall, the spots I put it on did seem to heal up and achieve a cleaner scab and softer skin around it.

Apparent cons of this experiment? The milk can sometimes burn (but again, everything burns when it touches my inflamed skin spots… even water) and it’s also a little sticky but it dries sticky-free. Fun fact, I have a pet peeve about being sticky. I hate it. So much.

After this self experiment, I was more curious to support why I might be seeing the results I saw so I did some low level cursory research. Also speaking of research, I received my diploma the other day. I officially have a Master of Science in Health Sciences from MGH Institute of Health Professions. I am now a MASTER of science. The academic title of master seems somewhat archaic; I envision myself similar in status to an entry-level alchemist or and mage, as I have established myself in a trade, but it will still take years to perfect my craft. Anyway…

There’s not a lot of recent research being done (or at least it’s not readily available yet) but I did come across two recent ones. This first paper, of which I could only access the abstract, tested wound healing of the cornea (yes, of the eye) in mice using human breast milk, milk from mice, artificial tears, and the control group. The results were that the human breast milk caused the fastest healing, followed by the mouse milk. The other two groups (artifucial tears and the control) were still not healed by the end of day two. The other study I found was published in 2015 in Nature, and it was titled, “Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of accuse inflammation”. It came to the conclusion that the lipid mediator-specializing proresolving mediator profile (a ratio of sorts between lipid mediators and specialized proresolving mediators) in human milk helped the macrophages (or cells that engulf bad bacteria) to contain pathogens and remove dead cells (in a process called efferocytosis- my word of the day). It is important to note that this was seen in vivo (in mice), and that breast milk was not applied topically to the skin. If the results are applicable to humans, I see this study as being useful because people with eczema suffer high levels of inflammation internally not just on their skin, and because turning off the inflammatory phase is also important in wound healing (more on this in a later post).

After that article I backtracked and wanted to know more about what breast milk is, which led me to this document that included the various components of breast milk (though I can not find the professor or the molecular virology lab anywhere else on the web…). Also note that the tables say the various factors are tested “in vitro” meaning not in the organism (for example, secretory IgA from breast milk was probably removed from breast milk and tested in a petri dish against E. coli). Even so, the breadth of potential abilities of breast milk, due to its staggering list of factors alone was interesting in its own right.

In conclusion, though I don’t think breast milk applied externally heals the mother’s eczema or TSW, I do think it can help me with superficial wounds, especially when it’s the middle of the night and I am otherwise unmotivated to leave the bed even if I’ve been scratching.

 

REFERENCES

Arnardottir H, Orr SK, Dalli J, Serhan CN. Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of acute inflammation. Mucosal Immunology. 2016, May 9;9(3):757-766.

Asena L, Suveren EH, Karabay G, Durson Altinors D. Human Breast Milk Drops Promote Coreanl Epithelial Wound Healing. Curr Eye Res. 2017 Apr;43(4):506-512.

Brink, Susan. “Why The Breastfeeding Vs. Formula Debate Is Especially Critical In Poor Countries.” Goats and Soda, https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/13/628105632/is-infant-formula-ever-a-good-option-in-poor-countries?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20180719&utm_campaign=goatsandsoda&utm_term=nprnews. Accessed 1 Oct 2018.