career, eczema, my journey, NEA, travel/traveling

having a career with eczema

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Last week in my email I saw a post from NEA about a woman named Helen Piña who described what it’s like for her to have eczema with her job. I was intrigued, as eczema has completely derailed my initial career plans, and because Helen is the first person I relate to whose eczema flares got crazy in the early 20s. I can definitely relate to her about causing little clouds of skin snow to rain down when leaving a spot (ugh), as well as trying to figure out when to scratch but also staying mindful to not end up doing it randomly while working. My catch was that I worked as a physical therapy aide and so I had to do be in close quarters with patients, leading them through exercises and demonstrating activities, so I really didn’t feel comfortable having so many skin issues around them. Physical therapy school was even more difficult in that regard because then I did have to physically manipulate patients (can you imagine trying to stretch someone’s hamstring and them seeing little skin flakes falling off of you?). Personally, I always felt incredibly self conscious about it as it also seems like a health risk. Needless to say, it did factor into my decision to leave that field. That being said, I find it extremely encouraging to hear about how people make it work, keep their careers, and find an new normalcy in their day-to-day.

Nowadays I have been inspired to find other lines of work to that fit my skin too. But more on that another day.

Speaking of day-to-day life. I signed up a while back to be on the mailing list for the National Eczema Association’s Ambassador program, which means that when the opportunity arises, I am wiling to go meet with various people involved in making policies around eczema to voice my own experiences in hopes of shaping the policies directly around patient input (if you’re interested, here’s the link to the NEA ambassador page). A few days ago an email came through asking for ambassadors who were interested in going to Chicago (with a stipend, food and lodging covered, and travel expenses covered up to a certain amount). I think it’s amazing that the NEA is acting so efficiently as a liaison between the people experiencing eczema and then people and organizations who are doing the research and making the policies that will affect the people with eczema.  After all, when are you offered a chance to have basically an all-expense-paid trip to go and try and change the policies that impact your day to day life?

 

alternative/holistic medicine, eczema, food and nutrition, my journey, sugar, women's health

on medicinal ideologies

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Something that has always fascinated me has been the underlying ideologies behind medicine of different regions/cultures, be it modern western science, naturopathic medicine (which can blend a lot of the holistic and western medicine practices), traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, or yoga.

As western medicine is the most familiar, I will talk about that briefly at the end.

The other day I went to a Qi Gong and Tai Chi school where I talked with one of the instructors about the concepts behind medical Qi Gong. We talked a little bit about my skin and the instructor mentioned how the skin and the liver are connected in the Chinese ideology and so if the skin is showing lots of signs of disease, there may be an issue with the liver’s digestion. She also mentioned that I would be a person expected to have an imbalance of yang over yin. Yin and yang are seen as complimentary energies that keep the body in balance, with yin being the cooler, more feminine energy, and yang being a hotter, more masculine one.

In regards to nutrition, when I was seeing an acupuncturist a few years ago, she also talked about the dietary components that might be causing my skin issues. She also believed that I had an imbalance of yin and yang, (in that again I had more yang), hence the inflammation. Her advice to me was to eat less spicy food, avoid sugars, and have more bitter herbs in my diet, as well as continuing the treatments I was getting from her in acupuncture, cupping, and massage.

The National Eczema Associate interviewed Dr. Xiu-Min Li (a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) who studies asthma and allergies (including AD) and went on to explain about traditional Chinese medicine and how it fits into the treatment of eczema. The article provides more insight into how TCM is starting to be incorporating into mainstream western medicine, with the goal of having an alternative to use before topical steroids. It would seem that many people currently turn to try traditional Chinese medicine when standard western medicine practices of topical/oral steroids and other topical medications don’t do the trick.

When I was doing my yoga teacher training a while back they talked about chakras. Chakras are energetic points of the subtle body and there are 7 of them that line the spinal column, and they each are meant to represent a basic level of human consciousness. According to what I learned during the training, when the third chakra (Manipura) is unbalanced, one can expect to see eczema and other stress-related skin conditions. This may be because the third chakra is connected to the detox related organs (like the liver) as well as the abdominals, obliques, etc.

Nutrition based in the Ayurvedic ideology talks about balancing the Pitta dosa (doshas are energies that control how we act, think, move, etc), and to do that they advise avoiding eggs, wheat, milk, nightshades, spicy foods, corn, shellfish, and overly sugary foods. Eczema is seen to be more of an excess of Pitta dosha, or more fire, hence trying to eliminate inflammatory foods.

[Here’s an anecdotal story published by the National Eczema Association a while back about a family that turned to Ayurveda when the western medicine wasn’t helping their daughter’s eczema].

In regards to modern western medicine practices, a few comparison points are developing that reflect the more holistic ideals in the ideologies mentioned above. For example, added sugar is more or less nationally seen as being inflammatory, and many doctors will caution against having a diet that includes too much of it. There are also more practices such as taking bleach baths to help reduce infection risk and other treatments that can be done at home without a prescription that a western doctor will recommend now. And the recommendations around lotions and moisturizers (over the counter) are more prevalent, though the brands which are suggested still vary. Light therapy/phototherapy is also recommended to help increase vitamin D exposure, and more and more doctors are also advising getting moving more to help with healing, as well as different solutions to try at night to help with sleep- from stress relieving techniques like meditation or taking a bath at night, to antihistamines.

I personally however, have not yet had a doctor who engaged me in a conversation that got more specifically into nutrition (minus not eating a lot of sugar or junk food). I am not sure if it is out of their scope of practice, but it has not come up in 26 years of seeing doctors, which surprises me. Many doctors, as far as I can tell, still think eczema is not really related to food, but as I do have food allergies I was born with, I would probably be a prime candidate to test for new allergies. The rub there is that generally doctors will prescribe getting a patch test done- but you have to have cleared up skin for the test results to be more or less accurate, and you can’t be on steroids at the time (and I haven’t had clear enough skin in about 3 years).

There is also the holistic medicine movement we see that is not specifically tied to any of the above ideologies. It includes more of western herbalism, often crossed with different nutrition changes and protocols, like the autoimmune protocol, or the elimination diet, or other variations to help with what is called the “leaky gut” syndrome. There are tons of resources from bloggers, nutritionists, doctors, etc about how to go about a nutritional change to heal whatever ailments you are undergoing with food, and I’ve also noticed a lot of sufferers of eczema have gone into nutrition after having success controlling their conditions with their dietary changes (one example being Prime Physique Nutrition). There are also movements to changing the whole lifestyle to be more holistic (like making your own cleaning products as well as skin creams, moisturizers, body wash products. A lot of this new movement is grounded in taking control of your health, often after having tried working with doctors in modern western practices for long periods of time unsuccessfully.

A health resurgence in America has been in herbalism. Some famous members of the community include Rosemary Gladstar (author of Herbal Healing for Women), Susan Weed (author of Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year), Aviva Romm, Mark Blumenthal (founder of the American Botanical Council), Christopher Hobbs, and many, many others. [Of note, I am usually deep into researching about women’s health, hence the references above. Gladstar does have a book on men’s health called Herbal Healing for Men].

From Gladstar’s book Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health (which I own) she briefly talks about her general advice as an herbalist for how women can keep balance in the bodies by doing “good living practices”, which she notes as having proper nutrition, ample enough rest, joyful exercise, self connection, and tonic herbs. Delving deeper into nutrition she says to eat foods close to their natural states (which also means eat what grows seasonally), pay attention to how you feel while eating and afterwards, eat organic when you can, and eat  alkalizing foods. She notes about the latter that a lot of the disorders women have thrive in acidic conditions (aka when we eat too many sweets and carbs).

Personally, I have found relief from the most extreme symptoms by modifying my diet (I usually avoid eating wheat products and sugar because I tend to over consume foods containing them), and by using products approved by the NEA that avoid parabens, alcohol, and other chemicals that can be irritants for people with eczema. Acupuncture did seem to help- though I can’t say it was in isolation, since I did get massaged each time (which is also known for helping eczema). I tend to only bathe in a diluted bleach bath when I feel like my skin is getting close to infection (not sure how to explain how I know when that point is), otherwise this winter I did take a lot of baths with either apple cider vinegar (works similarly to bleach) or epsom salt (tends to calm me down and works well for helping me get through the dry out phase of TSW faster). I generally avoid using topical steroids when I can because I have gone through withdrawals before, and because I don’t like the reliance on something that doesn’t fix my issue (usually starting on steroids means I have to stay on them because I flare back up as soon as I start a taper).

All in all it does feel like there are more overlaps occurring over time in these differing ideologies, and we are seeing them sort of blend together in effort to figure out how to deal with chronic non-fatal diseases such as eczema. Whether or not they work still mostly seems to comes down to a person-by-person basis.

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).

eczema, NEA, skin care, topical steroid withdrawal, travel/traveling

my eczema travel wishlist

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As the movement of creating more open dialogue around living with eczema grows, more and more events and opportunities are flourishing to help spread the word too.

My top 5 choices of places/events/conferences/camps/programs I would want to attend include:

  • Eczema Expo: Created by the National Eczema Association, this event brings together patients, caregivers, medical professionals, and product makers all to talk and connect over eczema. They even give you an idea of what the trip is like here. It just seems like a Renaissance Faire for sufferers of eczema and I’d love to go next year (hopefully it’s in Maryland or Massachusetts one year though!).

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  • Camp Wonder: This is an amazing program run by the Children’s Skin Disease Foundation that allows children to experience camp despite their skin conditions. I would love to be a counselor one day!

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  • Avène Hydrotherapy Center: First of all, this center is in the south of France, which is a beautiful land I long to re-visit. The spring supposedly was discovered to have healing properties when a Marquis’ horse was cured of pruritus after a few swims.  In time a hydrotherapy center and dermatological lab were built there, and so far, the testimonials of people getting treated there are beyond promising. Plus, like I said before, south of France. Be still my heart. Note: Avène also has US product lines now.

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  • Hannan-Chuo Hospital – A hospital in Japan thats dermatology department is run by Dr. Sato, who does a lot of research and treating of topical steroid withdrawal. You check in as a patient for a few months, and come out cured apparently. Unfortunately his blog is only in Japanese, but I’ll link it here for you multilingual individuals).
  • The Dead Sea – I hear its mud/water has some amazing healing properties due to its salts. It seems like many companies have turned the mud/water into packable salts for medicinal cosmetic lines, for example making bath soaks and other products, but I would love to be able to go there one day and just roll around for myself in the sea.

Other random events and classes that would pique my interest if I came across them and make me want to up and travel would be:

  • yoga retreats for skin sufferers
  • skin herbal remedy classes
  • book chats by writers with eczema
  • eczema in the arts conventions
  • eczema rehabs

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).