using boob milk for more than the baby

agriculture animal blue sky breakfast
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As some of you may know I am currently nursing my 3 month old baby girl, and in doing so as she is my first, I’ve learned that leaking is a thing (sometimes it occurs when she’s nursing on one side- the other side will start to drip milk, and other times they seem to leak for no apparently reason at all). As I wear nursing pads in my shirts during the day, the problem begins at night when I’m in bed trying to sleep. The leakage then can be really annoying. So my most recent solution has been spreading the milk on my skin, because why not- it’s already leaking all over it anyway.

My less impulsive logic for trying this experiment came from some research I had been doing a few weeks ago about breastmilk and its health benefits for the baby. Fi got sick and I wanted to know how her immature immune system could handle sickness when she only intakes breastmilk as her food source. This search led me to an internet viral photo showing how a mom’s breast milk changed when her infant got sick. The 2013 study mentioned in that post talks about breast milk’s immunological function and explains how when the mom or baby get sick, the number of leukocytes (aka white blood cells) in the breast milk drastically increases to help protect them, because leukocytes help fight disease (which I found to be such a cool example of symbiosis. I personally have also noticed that breastfeeding seems to keep both me and the baby from getting too severe of sicknesses. In fact, my mom, mother-in-law, and husband each got sick after the baby was born yet Fi and I were fine!).

I also read an article by NPR addressing the breastfeeding versus formula debate for poor countries.  A point it stated made me more curious about breast milk; it said formula can cause increased risks of diarrhea and respiratory infections. I assumed this is so because it requires using water to make (and clean sources are not always available in impoverished countries) but maybe it’s also because formula doesn’t have the same chemical and bacterial composition to allow it to be readily accepted by the baby’s developing digestive and immune systems? By extension I supposed that breast milk had to have some component in it that generally allows it to not irritate the digestive and immune systems*… which is my big sign to think “MICROBIOME” (* this of course is excluding when the baby has allergies or sensitivities to something the mom is eating that is going into her breast milk). The article also talked about how it’s weird that we are constantly trying to research the benefits of breastfeeding when it’s as natural as “breathing, chewing, hearing, passing stool”. But we live in a society where we need evidence and so I decided to play the game of informal (and badly controlled) science to see if I could test my own theory, that breast milk may help with (eczema) healing.

I did not participate in the rigors of the scientific process because I am lazy and I doubt Fi would be content amusing herself long enough for me to do it, but instead I just dabbed some breast milk on my shallow cuts every now and then instead of using neosporin or leaving the cut alone. My observations: it would seem as though breast milk can help with reducing the pain of shallow cuts (I tried it on the cracks on my knuckles and outer ears, cuts on my ankles and hands), and helps to speed up the healing of said cuts. It does not moisturize (the spots I put it on tended to be drier the next day… though that could be because when cuts heal on me, they start skin flaking…) but overall, the spots I put it on did seem to heal up and achieve a cleaner scab and softer skin around it.

Apparent cons of this experiment? The milk can sometimes burn (but again, everything burns when it touches my inflamed skin spots… even water) and it’s also a little sticky but it dries sticky-free. Fun fact, I have a pet peeve about being sticky. I hate it. So much.

After this self experiment, I was more curious to support why I might be seeing the results I saw so I did some low level cursory research. Also speaking of research, I received my diploma the other day. I officially have a Master of Science in Health Sciences from MGH Institute of Health Professions. I am now a MASTER of science. The academic title of master seems somewhat archaic; I envision myself similar in status to an entry-level alchemist or and mage, as I have established myself in a trade, but it will still take years to perfect my craft. Anyway…

There’s not a lot of recent research being done (or at least it’s not readily available yet) but I did come across two recent ones. This first paper, of which I could only access the abstract, tested wound healing of the cornea (yes, of the eye) in mice using human breast milk, milk from mice, artificial tears, and the control group. The results were that the human breast milk caused the fastest healing, followed by the mouse milk. The other two groups (artifucial tears and the control) were still not healed by the end of day two. The other study I found was published in 2015 in Nature, and it was titled, “Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of accuse inflammation”. It came to the conclusion that the lipid mediator-specializing proresolving mediator profile (a ratio of sorts between lipid mediators and specialized proresolving mediators) in human milk helped the macrophages (or cells that engulf bad bacteria) to contain pathogens and remove dead cells (in a process called efferocytosis- my word of the day). It is important to note that this was seen in vivo (in mice), and that breast milk was not applied topically to the skin. If the results are applicable to humans, I see this study as being useful because people with eczema suffer high levels of inflammation internally not just on their skin, and because turning off the inflammatory phase is also important in wound healing (more on this in a later post).

After that article I backtracked and wanted to know more about what breast milk is, which led me to this document that included the various components of breast milk (though I can not find the professor or the molecular virology lab anywhere else on the web…). Also note that the tables say the various factors are tested “in vitro” meaning not in the organism (for example, secretory IgA from breast milk was probably removed from breast milk and tested in a petri dish against E. coli). Even so, the breadth of potential abilities of breast milk, due to its staggering list of factors alone was interesting in its own right.

In conclusion, though I don’t think breast milk applied externally heals the mother’s eczema or TSW, I do think it can help me with superficial wounds, especially when it’s the middle of the night and I am otherwise unmotivated to leave the bed even if I’ve been scratching.

 

REFERENCES

Arnardottir H, Orr SK, Dalli J, Serhan CN. Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of acute inflammation. Mucosal Immunology. 2016, May 9;9(3):757-766.

Asena L, Suveren EH, Karabay G, Durson Altinors D. Human Breast Milk Drops Promote Coreanl Epithelial Wound Healing. Curr Eye Res. 2017 Apr;43(4):506-512.

Brink, Susan. “Why The Breastfeeding Vs. Formula Debate Is Especially Critical In Poor Countries.” Goats and Soda, https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/13/628105632/is-infant-formula-ever-a-good-option-in-poor-countries?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20180719&utm_campaign=goatsandsoda&utm_term=nprnews. Accessed 1 Oct 2018.

how to handle a baby when you have eczema

white bed spread near a human foot during night time
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For the first few days after having my little one, I was on such a high of nerves and adrenaline that I felt great!  I had been on antibiotics while in the hospital, and after getting home my skin started to feel really dry. I started taking some probiotics and focusing on drinking lots of water (I knew getting enough sleep was a lost cause), and keeping my stress down.

Initially, my skin was calm enough that I had no problem doing skin-to-skin contact with baby Fi, but around week 4 or so I started to experience more flare symptoms- sweating, itching, redness- whenever I had the baby lay on me for too long. I started to have to wear long sleeves when holding her to not get overheated. I’m not exactly sure when this happened, but it may have also correlated when the humidity increased, and the temperature with it.

I’m not sure if it was due to the antibiotics, the temperature, the lack of sleep, the terrible diet I had in the hospital (think chicken fingers and ice cream for multiple meals in a day), or the hormone fluctuations but my skin definitely became more sensitive post-pregnancy. Though estrogen has been considered one of the reasons women can flare-up worse during pregnancy (see my post about pregnancy and eczema), after pregnancy the estrogen drops so it’s unclear what would be provoking my symptoms (besides the above mentioned items).

Either way I’ve had to be more creative about adjusting to life with a newborn. The biggest aspect I’ve had to cultivate is endless patience mixed with quick stress-reduction habits. My lackadaisical approach to getting house and life stuff done has been somewhat of a saving grace because my little one has wreaked havoc on my schedule. I’m exhausted in the afternoons, I have no idea what it feels like to sleep more than 3 hours at a time anymore, I tend to eat a bit worse now (mostly eating too many carbs and too much) because I lack the self control to stay as dietarily balanced when I’m sleep deprived. It’s something I’ll have to work on in the coming months.

I find ways to not focus on my skin when it’s getting all sweaty from holding her and I have learned to wear light layers or wrap a small blanket between her and myself when breastfeeding to avoid irritating the more sensitive skin areas like my stomach.

There are some inherently awesome aspects to having a newborn when you have eczema (at least in my experience). For one, I tend not to think about myself as much so I am not as aware when I am itchy. She keeps me busy to such an extent that even when I’m immersing my hands in water (which is traditionally a huge irritant) to give her a bath, I barely notice. Also, lately my core temperature seems to be evening out even as my skin fluctuates (which means that the hot, sweaty skin nights and cold shivers have been decreasing). I actually enjoy the cold temperature more than I used to, and I don’t enjoy basking in the sun for quite as long.

And overall I do think that my skin has been able to consistently heal slowly but surely. I feel as though I look more or less human again, what with the redness decreasing.  I think the hormones from breastfeeding are helping my skin heal to some extent; I know my hair has gotten shinier, which is an awesome boon.