all posts, treatments, women's health

things that suck, literally

nature grass black outdoors
Photo by Leroy Huckett on Pexels.com

I haven’t fallen off the face of the earth, I just no longer subscribe to the spacetime continuum on it. But you’ve heard enough of my excuses about why I’m so untimely and inconsistent with posting, so let’s just skip that rerun.

Today’s topic is things that suck. But literally suck, as in suction, not in that they are uncool. The latter is way too arbitrarily subjective for me.

Anyway, so I’ve been pondering about my skin health, especially that of my feet. As a whole my skin has improved immensely; so much so that going outside in 20 degree weather does  not reduce me to being a miserable shivering mess any longer. I feel like each day, despite my diet not being on point and my sleep amounts being wonky, my skin is developing a more human luster again. Obviously this is exciting beyond proportions, however, my feet in particular still look horrendous and itch aggressively at times. Many areas, especially where the foot skin meets the plantar skin surface (bottom of the foot), there is a tough thickened layer of scarred skin, much like a callous but not so strong and mostly still flaky. From staring at it collectively for hours (and talking with my sister, who is good at thinking about skin care), I have come to the conclusion that I sorely lack blood flow in those areas, and so the trick now is figuring how to remedy that. I’ve been trying massage techniques as part of a bedtime routine and maybe it’s working, but at any rate I started envisioning a new “quick fix” direction: leeches!

Here me out. Leeches are small and single purpose-y: they bite to latch to human skin, secrete a light numbing type chemical, and then they start sucking and drawing blood to satiate themselves, and when they are done their fat content selves detach and they fall off. Well, what if they were applied to those thickened eczema spots, like on my feet? Could their ability to draw blood work in my favor to get the needed blood flow to that area to promote better healing? Would it reduce the thick skin build-up?

I then got curious if any medical practitioners have tried using leeches for eczema and recorded their findings. Turns out the answer is yes, but so far only in India (or that I could find). The study I did find had no control group (so no way to control for placebo effects or to compare in general) but they did find that leeches helped the eczema spots. Honestly I’m not sure why though. The study mentioned the leeches’ secretion having a microbial effect and the penetration of the epidermis and dermis layers of the skin, as well as the increased bloodflow the leeches provoked, so maybe I was on to something there.

The next thing that sucks isn’t a thing at all, but my baby. As a breastfed baby, my little one practices her sucking multiple times a day (I don’t pump honestly because I’m not good at it, so it feels like it takes forever just to get a low yield), meaning my schedule is worked around her needs. While I don’t mind this, it has caused me to wonder how I could have a career, as there are not many jobs I could take her along with me in this day and age (or at least not that I know of).

In short, I started coursework to become a postpartum doula. It will probably take me a few years to finish it all, mostly because you need to spend 5 hours minimum with 4 separate families and Fiona isn’t ready for that duration of separation yet, plus I don’t have any families lined up. That and also Fiona has developed complete object permanence, and so we are drastically having to readjust her sleeping routine again.

In other news, I have also started a role as a research writer for a site called PPDJourney, which features stories from moms about their experiences with postpartum depression. I’ll be doing monthly pieces on things that relate to maternal mental health.

Also I may be possibly developing a course with my favorite herbalist group, but I’ll keep that under wraps until it becomes more concrete.

Lastly, yes I know the cover picture is a slug, not leech, but in the immortal words of Rick the Hormone Monster “What’d ya gonna do?”

 

REFERENCES

Shankar KMP, Rao SD, and Gopalakrishnaiah V. A clinical trial for evaluation of leech application in the management of Vicarcikā(Eczema). Anc Sci Life. 2014 Apr-Jun; 33(4): 236–241.

all posts, eczema hacks, miscellaneous, treatments, women's health

policy and innovation around skin

blur brainstorming business close up
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

A long while back I came across this article called From IUDS to IVT – Designing for Women’s Health on medium a while back, by Emilie Lasseron. In a nutshell, she talks about the new innovations in women’s health and how it is important for creators in this realm to be mindful of their audience. Naturally I tried to pattern match this to blend into the eczema realm as well, to combine my two interests/where I’m at in life now.

Lasseron’s big 5 bullet points were to “design:

for passive engagement”, which was where she explained how we have a culture where we don’t really think about fertility until we start trying. This is similar to what we see with eczema (with eczema being a negative thing that people don’t try but experience). People don’t really think much about it, until it starts to take over and disrupt their way of life.

for myths, not just the facts”, in which she explained that we have to meet people where they are at, even if that means from a perspective that may be incorrect or grounded in myths. This is huge for eczema. From dispelling the idea that we have contracted some contagion, to explaining that no, coconut will not cure the skin, there are so many “old wives’ tales” and other myths to slog through that when talking to someone new to having eczema, it’s important to be able to calmly and concisely explain the basics and why some of the commonly heard remedies may be wholly ineffective.

for the conversation women want to have with their doctor”, in which she described creating tools to help women feel comfortable getting their questions out to doctors and to help them reclaim their agency. Which is also CRUCIAL with eczema. Patients with eczema are already feeling terrible about their skin. And so it is so important that they can feel able to openly talk with their dermatologist and not feel judged or scrutinized for their choices, where they are coming from in their educational journey, etc.

with as few assumptions as possible”, in which she talks about not assuming women know everything about their bodies (most of us don’t), and uses the example of a period tracker app that expected you to know your cycle length before you could sign-up (I never personally know how long my cycle is). This is like if there is an app made for eczema and it keeps requiring the patient to know exactly when the flare started, what we ate that day, how long we slept, did we encounter any new allergens, etc. It is hard to track all of these little life factors, especially if we didn’t think we were going to flare, or we are new to having to deal with severe eczema.

with side effects in mind”, in which she talks about making products that allow women to talk about/understand other side effects, an example being an app that tells you you may be more constipated during the luteal phase of your period. This would be the equivalent of an app that gets you to talk about various symptoms and co-morbidities of eczema like the oozing or the flaking or the infections, the isolation or depression, etc, so that it would be easier to identify:

  • one, what stage of a flare the person is in, and
  • two, what is most common, and therefore important to address (like increasing rates of depression).

All in all it was a fairly quick read and highlighted a lot of the innovation that is and needs to continue to happen within women’s health (and could be extrapolated to what innovation needs to happen in the eczema world too) to allow for better healthcare and treatment.

Speaking of innovation, I entirely missed hearing about this event: Make The Breast Pump Not Suck, a hackathon that happened in Boston April 27th-29th last year. It was hosted to try to address not just pump technology itself, but policies around maternity leave, breastfeeding spaces at workplaces, what barriers to breastfeeding exist, how to build community engagement, and getting stories from different women about their experiences. There were also community innovators mentioned who are doing awesome things in the field of women’s and maternity health (see here), including one in Boston called the Neighborhood Birth Clinic! The group is trying to open a free standing birth clinic in Dorchester. The event also highlighted different independent innovators like Melissa Hanna who created Mahmee, a secure platform that lets providers coordinate healthcare of both the prenatal and postpartum stages.

My dream is that there will be hackathons and the like for innovations with eczema too, besides just the Eczema Expo. And hey, if not, maybe that’s what I’ll work to pioneer one day.

all posts, the eczema body, treatments

using boob milk for more than the baby

agriculture animal blue sky breakfast
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

As some of you may know I am currently nursing my 3 month old baby girl, and in doing so as she is my first, I’ve learned that leaking is a thing (sometimes it occurs when she’s nursing on one side- the other side will start to drip milk, and other times they seem to leak for no apparently reason at all). As I wear nursing pads in my shirts during the day, the problem begins at night when I’m in bed trying to sleep. The leakage then can be really annoying. So my most recent solution has been spreading the milk on my skin, because why not- it’s already leaking all over it anyway.

My less impulsive logic for trying this experiment came from some research I had been doing a few weeks ago about breastmilk and its health benefits for the baby. Fi got sick and I wanted to know how her immature immune system could handle sickness when she only intakes breastmilk as her food source. This search led me to an internet viral photo showing how a mom’s breast milk changed when her infant got sick. The 2013 study mentioned in that post talks about breast milk’s immunological function and explains how when the mom or baby get sick, the number of leukocytes (aka white blood cells) in the breast milk drastically increases to help protect them, because leukocytes help fight disease (which I found to be such a cool example of symbiosis. I personally have also noticed that breastfeeding seems to keep both me and the baby from getting too severe of sicknesses. In fact, my mom, mother-in-law, and husband each got sick after the baby was born yet Fi and I were fine!).

I also read an article by NPR addressing the breastfeeding versus formula debate for poor countries.  A point it stated made me more curious about breast milk; it said formula can cause increased risks of diarrhea and respiratory infections. I assumed this is so because it requires using water to make (and clean sources are not always available in impoverished countries) but maybe it’s also because formula doesn’t have the same chemical and bacterial composition to allow it to be readily accepted by the baby’s developing digestive and immune systems? By extension I supposed that breast milk had to have some component in it that generally allows it to not irritate the digestive and immune systems*… which is my big sign to think “MICROBIOME” (* this of course is excluding when the baby has allergies or sensitivities to something the mom is eating that is going into her breast milk). The article also talked about how it’s weird that we are constantly trying to research the benefits of breastfeeding when it’s as natural as “breathing, chewing, hearing, passing stool”. But we live in a society where we need evidence and so I decided to play the game of informal (and badly controlled) science to see if I could test my own theory, that breast milk may help with (eczema) healing.

I did not participate in the rigors of the scientific process because I am lazy and I doubt Fi would be content amusing herself long enough for me to do it, but instead I just dabbed some breast milk on my shallow cuts every now and then instead of using neosporin or leaving the cut alone. My observations: it would seem as though breast milk can help with reducing the pain of shallow cuts (I tried it on the cracks on my knuckles and outer ears, cuts on my ankles and hands), and helps to speed up the healing of said cuts. It does not moisturize (the spots I put it on tended to be drier the next day… though that could be because when cuts heal on me, they start skin flaking…) but overall, the spots I put it on did seem to heal up and achieve a cleaner scab and softer skin around it.

Apparent cons of this experiment? The milk can sometimes burn (but again, everything burns when it touches my inflamed skin spots… even water) and it’s also a little sticky but it dries sticky-free. Fun fact, I have a pet peeve about being sticky. I hate it. So much.

After this self experiment, I was more curious to support why I might be seeing the results I saw so I did some low level cursory research. Also speaking of research, I received my diploma the other day. I officially have a Master of Science in Health Sciences from MGH Institute of Health Professions. I am now a MASTER of science. The academic title of master seems somewhat archaic; I envision myself similar in status to an entry-level alchemist or and mage, as I have established myself in a trade, but it will still take years to perfect my craft. Anyway…

There’s not a lot of recent research being done (or at least it’s not readily available yet) but I did come across two recent ones. This first paper, of which I could only access the abstract, tested wound healing of the cornea (yes, of the eye) in mice using human breast milk, milk from mice, artificial tears, and the control group. The results were that the human breast milk caused the fastest healing, followed by the mouse milk. The other two groups (artifucial tears and the control) were still not healed by the end of day two. The other study I found was published in 2015 in Nature, and it was titled, “Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of accuse inflammation”. It came to the conclusion that the lipid mediator-specializing proresolving mediator profile (a ratio of sorts between lipid mediators and specialized proresolving mediators) in human milk helped the macrophages (or cells that engulf bad bacteria) to contain pathogens and remove dead cells (in a process called efferocytosis- my word of the day). It is important to note that this was seen in vivo (in mice), and that breast milk was not applied topically to the skin. If the results are applicable to humans, I see this study as being useful because people with eczema suffer high levels of inflammation internally not just on their skin, and because turning off the inflammatory phase is also important in wound healing (more on this in a later post).

After that article I backtracked and wanted to know more about what breast milk is, which led me to this document that included the various components of breast milk (though I can not find the professor or the molecular virology lab anywhere else on the web…). Also note that the tables say the various factors are tested “in vitro” meaning not in the organism (for example, secretory IgA from breast milk was probably removed from breast milk and tested in a petri dish against E. coli). Even so, the breadth of potential abilities of breast milk, due to its staggering list of factors alone was interesting in its own right.

In conclusion, though I don’t think breast milk applied externally heals the mother’s eczema or TSW, I do think it can help me with superficial wounds, especially when it’s the middle of the night and I am otherwise unmotivated to leave the bed even if I’ve been scratching.

 

REFERENCES

Arnardottir H, Orr SK, Dalli J, Serhan CN. Human milk proresolving mediators stimulate resolution of acute inflammation. Mucosal Immunology. 2016, May 9;9(3):757-766.

Asena L, Suveren EH, Karabay G, Durson Altinors D. Human Breast Milk Drops Promote Coreanl Epithelial Wound Healing. Curr Eye Res. 2017 Apr;43(4):506-512.

Brink, Susan. “Why The Breastfeeding Vs. Formula Debate Is Especially Critical In Poor Countries.” Goats and Soda, https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandsoda/2018/07/13/628105632/is-infant-formula-ever-a-good-option-in-poor-countries?utm_source=npr_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_content=20180719&utm_campaign=goatsandsoda&utm_term=nprnews. Accessed 1 Oct 2018.