exercise and activity, my journey

yoga for the atopically inclined

pexels-photo-588561.jpeg

This is a post I initially wrote after talking about the different alternative medicines and their content. I never ended up posting it because I had the baby and promptly forgot I wrote it. But without further ado, here is a post that focuses a bit more on the physical aspects of one of those holistic practices; yoga.

Though I love exercising, I am no stranger to avoiding heavy aerobically-intense exercise because of the nasty skin side effects that occur during a flare (the flushing sensations, the heating skin, the sweating/wetness in flexor surfaces, the rashes, and the insatiable itching). One of the times I got the best reprieve from my flares and related skin symptoms was February of 2016 when I was doing a 200-hour yoga teacher training. I took anywhere from 1-3 classes, 5-7 days of the week in rooms with high temperatures and lots of humidity. As I breathed through new poses and slowly worked my muscles and  focused on breathing and meditation, I felt stronger and better day by day. I won’t say my eczema went away because it didn’t, but the movements and concentration on my breathing did help my skin improve a lot, and in February no less (usually the winter months are worse for my skin).  At the same time, practicing that much yoga naturally made me want to eat cleaner because I felt heavy if I tried to practice after eating unhealthy foods (so at the time I tried out the Whole 30 Diet).

As I tried to recover from the particular cold, damp prolonged and lingering last bit of the Northeast winter weather, I decided I wanted to make use of my teacher training and research the best exercises to promote blood flow, skin healing, and stress reduction. My goal? To help my own skin maintenance (and the skin of anyone else who wishes to try this routine). So first I’ll give a brief explanation of some the theories behind how yoga can help eczema. Then later in the post I’ll show a few poses that have been said to be most beneficial to add to a yoga practice (and mostly ones that a beginner could do) to help the skin.

From my teacher training I learned that in yoga, there are 7 major chakras, or energy cluster points, that line up with the spinal column where nadis, or channels intersect. These channels carry prana or our life force energy. Of the 7 chakras, each corresponding to a respective spot on our spinal column, the 3rd chakra, Manipura is said to be unbalanced when we see skin conditions like eczema. Manipura is located in the solar plexus and corresponds to physical body parts such as the detox organs (liver, spleen, etc). When this chakra is unbalanced, as in it is underactive, people may feel a lack of control or a tendency to withdrawal from social situations.  Poses said to help invigorate this chakra include core strengthening poses such as those that entail isometric contractions, and breathing focus. This can include poses that entail twists (because they engage the core muscles to be able to do the poses well, and are said to help with detoxing).

So first off, does yoga truly help eczema? Well, some studies have show that it helps reduce inflammation after moderate to strenuous exercise. Others indicate it helps with the glycation process (mentioned in my post about sugar’s effects on eczema), by increasing the muscles’ glucose uptake, and therefore reducing blood sugar levels.

Yoga also entails a lot of focus on breathing (which can be beneficial for both getting you to distract your mind away from the itch and improving circulation of O2). It also often includes a meditative component, and meditation has also been seen to help eczema. It can be useful for reducing stress levels and improving sleep as well.

In general all of those effects would help alleviate a lot of the issues that eczema comes with, and personally I got more into yoga because it was one activity that didn’t induce worser flares for me. Plus getting a good night’s sleep is huge, since we do so much healing when we are catching some z’s.

Here is my take on poses for eczema, though most of these poses are somewhat “general” because they are known to help symptoms of eczema (such as inflammation, bad circulation, stress), aka they benefit the skin generally. Then again, there is no “cure” for eczema in isolation, so getting up and moving and in this case doing yoga will most likely help with eczema too.

Here are specific poses I found listed on various websites that were said to help the skin (with photos of me demonstrating! Note: I won’t demo the twists as I am over 8 months pregnant at the moment).

Livestrong.com suggests a lot of inversions (or poses with the head below the heart) including:

  • Legs Up a Wall (beginner friendly. I only stayed here for a few seconds to take this picture before getting off my back because it’s not the most comfortable when 38 weeks pregnant).

tumblr_inline_pafskloZNE1rq3xim_500.jpg

  • Camel Pose (can be modified to be more beginner friendly. Note: keeping your hips pushing forward so they are lined over your knees. Also note that I am not reaching for my ankles because I am too pregnant to keep good form attempting that so I’m just reaching my arms downwards).

tumblr_inline_pafsmwbr7U1rq3xim_500.jpg

  • Wheel (needs a level of back/hip flexor mobility… wouldn’t suggest it for pure beginners and I will update myself doing it when eventually).

From healthline.com we have asanas for beginners to yoga with the intent to decrease stress (in this case for psoriasis, but stress is stress):

  • Child’s Pose (my big toes are touching and my knees are out wide as the mat, and I am sinking my hips down and back while reaching my arms forward. Though I am limited to how far I can stretch downwards by the baby).

tumblr_inline_pafsp2DUDl1rq3xim_500

  • Salutation Seal (never knew it was called this, but essentially you sit cross-legged, keep your back nice and tall, and bring your hands to your chest like you are praying).

tumblr_inline_pafsppyjn51rq3xim_500

And lastly, a few from HolisticVanity who brings up poses to help with inflammation:

  • Seated Twist (again I’ll get around to adding this photo)
  • Revolved Chair (ditto this one)
  • Warrior 1  (note that my lower back has a lot of curvature here, which is not ideal. The baby is pulled me forward and it’s hard to compensate, but generally you want to reduce some of that low back curving to make sure you are setting yourself up for the best alignment to continue the safest practice).

tumblr_inline_pafsqg5StS1rq3xim_500

  • Chair (note: I have my feet hips width distance apart to accommodate the baby, but normally the feet are together will a little space between the heels. Also I need to relax my shoulders down more and pull my ribs in to have better form, but my ribs are also flared out because I’m 38 weeks pregnant!!).

tumblr_inline_pafsqqSWK11rq3xim_500

alternative/holistic medicine, eczema, food and nutrition, my journey, sugar, women's health

on medicinal ideologies

waterlily-pink-water-lily-water-plant-158465.jpeg

Something that has always fascinated me has been the underlying ideologies behind medicine of different regions/cultures, be it modern western science, naturopathic medicine (which can blend a lot of the holistic and western medicine practices), traditional Chinese medicine, Ayurveda, or yoga.

As western medicine is the most familiar, I will talk about that briefly at the end.

The other day I went to a Qi Gong and Tai Chi school where I talked with one of the instructors about the concepts behind medical Qi Gong. We talked a little bit about my skin and the instructor mentioned how the skin and the liver are connected in the Chinese ideology and so if the skin is showing lots of signs of disease, there may be an issue with the liver’s digestion. She also mentioned that I would be a person expected to have an imbalance of yang over yin. Yin and yang are seen as complimentary energies that keep the body in balance, with yin being the cooler, more feminine energy, and yang being a hotter, more masculine one.

In regards to nutrition, when I was seeing an acupuncturist a few years ago, she also talked about the dietary components that might be causing my skin issues. She also believed that I had an imbalance of yin and yang, (in that again I had more yang), hence the inflammation. Her advice to me was to eat less spicy food, avoid sugars, and have more bitter herbs in my diet, as well as continuing the treatments I was getting from her in acupuncture, cupping, and massage.

The National Eczema Associate interviewed Dr. Xiu-Min Li (a Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai) who studies asthma and allergies (including AD) and went on to explain about traditional Chinese medicine and how it fits into the treatment of eczema. The article provides more insight into how TCM is starting to be incorporating into mainstream western medicine, with the goal of having an alternative to use before topical steroids. It would seem that many people currently turn to try traditional Chinese medicine when standard western medicine practices of topical/oral steroids and other topical medications don’t do the trick.

When I was doing my yoga teacher training a while back they talked about chakras. Chakras are energetic points of the subtle body and there are 7 of them that line the spinal column, and they each are meant to represent a basic level of human consciousness. According to what I learned during the training, when the third chakra (Manipura) is unbalanced, one can expect to see eczema and other stress-related skin conditions. This may be because the third chakra is connected to the detox related organs (like the liver) as well as the abdominals, obliques, etc.

Nutrition based in the Ayurvedic ideology talks about balancing the Pitta dosa (doshas are energies that control how we act, think, move, etc), and to do that they advise avoiding eggs, wheat, milk, nightshades, spicy foods, corn, shellfish, and overly sugary foods. Eczema is seen to be more of an excess of Pitta dosha, or more fire, hence trying to eliminate inflammatory foods.

[Here’s an anecdotal story published by the National Eczema Association a while back about a family that turned to Ayurveda when the western medicine wasn’t helping their daughter’s eczema].

In regards to modern western medicine practices, a few comparison points are developing that reflect the more holistic ideals in the ideologies mentioned above. For example, added sugar is more or less nationally seen as being inflammatory, and many doctors will caution against having a diet that includes too much of it. There are also more practices such as taking bleach baths to help reduce infection risk and other treatments that can be done at home without a prescription that a western doctor will recommend now. And the recommendations around lotions and moisturizers (over the counter) are more prevalent, though the brands which are suggested still vary. Light therapy/phototherapy is also recommended to help increase vitamin D exposure, and more and more doctors are also advising getting moving more to help with healing, as well as different solutions to try at night to help with sleep- from stress relieving techniques like meditation or taking a bath at night, to antihistamines.

I personally however, have not yet had a doctor who engaged me in a conversation that got more specifically into nutrition (minus not eating a lot of sugar or junk food). I am not sure if it is out of their scope of practice, but it has not come up in 26 years of seeing doctors, which surprises me. Many doctors, as far as I can tell, still think eczema is not really related to food, but as I do have food allergies I was born with, I would probably be a prime candidate to test for new allergies. The rub there is that generally doctors will prescribe getting a patch test done- but you have to have cleared up skin for the test results to be more or less accurate, and you can’t be on steroids at the time (and I haven’t had clear enough skin in about 3 years).

There is also the holistic medicine movement we see that is not specifically tied to any of the above ideologies. It includes more of western herbalism, often crossed with different nutrition changes and protocols, like the autoimmune protocol, or the elimination diet, or other variations to help with what is called the “leaky gut” syndrome. There are tons of resources from bloggers, nutritionists, doctors, etc about how to go about a nutritional change to heal whatever ailments you are undergoing with food, and I’ve also noticed a lot of sufferers of eczema have gone into nutrition after having success controlling their conditions with their dietary changes (one example being Prime Physique Nutrition). There are also movements to changing the whole lifestyle to be more holistic (like making your own cleaning products as well as skin creams, moisturizers, body wash products. A lot of this new movement is grounded in taking control of your health, often after having tried working with doctors in modern western practices for long periods of time unsuccessfully.

A health resurgence in America has been in herbalism. Some famous members of the community include Rosemary Gladstar (author of Herbal Healing for Women), Susan Weed (author of Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year), Aviva Romm, Mark Blumenthal (founder of the American Botanical Council), Christopher Hobbs, and many, many others. [Of note, I am usually deep into researching about women’s health, hence the references above. Gladstar does have a book on men’s health called Herbal Healing for Men].

From Gladstar’s book Herbal Recipes for Vibrant Health (which I own) she briefly talks about her general advice as an herbalist for how women can keep balance in the bodies by doing “good living practices”, which she notes as having proper nutrition, ample enough rest, joyful exercise, self connection, and tonic herbs. Delving deeper into nutrition she says to eat foods close to their natural states (which also means eat what grows seasonally), pay attention to how you feel while eating and afterwards, eat organic when you can, and eat  alkalizing foods. She notes about the latter that a lot of the disorders women have thrive in acidic conditions (aka when we eat too many sweets and carbs).

Personally, I have found relief from the most extreme symptoms by modifying my diet (I usually avoid eating wheat products and sugar because I tend to over consume foods containing them), and by using products approved by the NEA that avoid parabens, alcohol, and other chemicals that can be irritants for people with eczema. Acupuncture did seem to help- though I can’t say it was in isolation, since I did get massaged each time (which is also known for helping eczema). I tend to only bathe in a diluted bleach bath when I feel like my skin is getting close to infection (not sure how to explain how I know when that point is), otherwise this winter I did take a lot of baths with either apple cider vinegar (works similarly to bleach) or epsom salt (tends to calm me down and works well for helping me get through the dry out phase of TSW faster). I generally avoid using topical steroids when I can because I have gone through withdrawals before, and because I don’t like the reliance on something that doesn’t fix my issue (usually starting on steroids means I have to stay on them because I flare back up as soon as I start a taper).

All in all it does feel like there are more overlaps occurring over time in these differing ideologies, and we are seeing them sort of blend together in effort to figure out how to deal with chronic non-fatal diseases such as eczema. Whether or not they work still mostly seems to comes down to a person-by-person basis.

 

Note: Some of the above links are affiliate links. This means that if you click on one and purchase an item, I will receive a small affiliate commission (at no cost to you).